Not All Cancer Research Money Is Going Away During COVID University of Chicago Receives $10-million Gift For Cell Therapy – SurvivorNet

As the coronavirus pandemic goes on, cancer researchers around the country tell SurvivorNet that they fear their funding will be diverted to research on the virus. However there are bright spots. The University of Chicago says it just received a $10 million gift from an investor to fund their cellular therapy research for certain types of cancer. The money was provided by David Jonas, the CEO of JVC Investment Partners. The research will be conducted at David and Etta Jonas Center for Cellular Therapy.

Jonas donated the money to University of Chicago specifically because of Dr. Michael Bishops work. Dr. Bishop is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago and is a hematologist and oncologist. He specializes in treatments for leukemia and lymphomas and his research deals with relapse after stem cell transplantation.

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The funding will be put towards improving stem cell therapy, like CAR-T cell therapy.

Cell therapy has been revolutionary for patients with blood cancers This has been a game changer because these are patients who wouldve inevitably died. Their average life expectancy wouldve been six months. But CAR-T cells have permitted some of these patients to achieve complete remissions, says Dr. Bishop in a Chicago Tribune article about the fund.

This fund will help more researchers join the team to better advance therapies. This grant from Jonas comes at a time when cancer research is not gaining as much funding as COVID-19 research efforts.

The Charity organization Cancer Research U.K (CRUK) announced that due to COVID-19, many research areas are not receiving as much funding. Existing grants are being cut by 10% while research centers are being cut by 20%. Overall, CRUK is looking at over $54 million being cut from their research portfolio this year.

The charity admitted toThe Daily Telegraphthat the impact of this pandemic could set back the cancer research effort within the U.K potentially for many years, but the disruption in cancer research is proving to be a world-wide issue.

Researchers told SurvivorNet that newclinical trials in the United States may be pauseddue to restrictions in place during COVID-19. With that being said, it seems that some private donors are attempting to balance out these cuts through personal donations to research groups like Jonas is doing for University of Chicago.

Learn more about SurvivorNet's rigorous medical review process.

As the coronavirus pandemic goes on, cancer researchers around the country tell SurvivorNet that they fear their funding will be diverted to research on the virus. However there are bright spots. The University of Chicago says it just received a $10 million gift from an investor to fund their cellular therapy research for certain types of cancer. The money was provided by David Jonas, the CEO of JVC Investment Partners. The research will be conducted at David and Etta Jonas Center for Cellular Therapy.

Jonas donated the money to University of Chicago specifically because of Dr. Michael Bishops work. Dr. Bishop is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago and is a hematologist and oncologist. He specializes in treatments for leukemia and lymphomas and his research deals with relapse after stem cell transplantation.

The funding will be put towards improving stem cell therapy, like CAR-T cell therapy.

Cell therapy has been revolutionary for patients with blood cancers This has been a game changer because these are patients who wouldve inevitably died. Their average life expectancy wouldve been six months. But CAR-T cells have permitted some of these patients to achieve complete remissions, says Dr. Bishop in a Chicago Tribune article about the fund.

This fund will help more researchers join the team to better advance therapies. This grant from Jonas comes at a time when cancer research is not gaining as much funding as COVID-19 research efforts.

The Charity organization Cancer Research U.K (CRUK) announced that due to COVID-19, many research areas are not receiving as much funding. Existing grants are being cut by 10% while research centers are being cut by 20%. Overall, CRUK is looking at over $54 million being cut from their research portfolio this year.

The charity admitted toThe Daily Telegraphthat the impact of this pandemic could set back the cancer research effort within the U.K potentially for many years, but the disruption in cancer research is proving to be a world-wide issue.

Researchers told SurvivorNet that newclinical trials in the United States may be pauseddue to restrictions in place during COVID-19. With that being said, it seems that some private donors are attempting to balance out these cuts through personal donations to research groups like Jonas is doing for University of Chicago.

Learn more about SurvivorNet's rigorous medical review process.

Read more:
Not All Cancer Research Money Is Going Away During COVID University of Chicago Receives $10-million Gift For Cell Therapy - SurvivorNet

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