Category Archives: Stem Cell Medicine

Multiple Doses of Stem Cells Show Potential in Treating Severe Asthma – PR Web

Inflammatory and remodeling processes and immunosuppressive effects in house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic asthma.

DURHAM, N.C. (PRWEB) November 20, 2019

A study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM) describes how multiple doses of a type of stem cell called mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) might offer a new way to treat people suffering from severe asthma.

An asthma attack is triggered by allergens entering the lungs and causing swelling of the airways. This sets off a domino effect that results in narrowing of the airways from the nose and mouth to the lungs. The most severe cases can lead to death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in 13 people have asthma. There is no cure, but it can be managed in most cases with proper prevention and treatment.

The study in SCTM, conducted by researchers at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and the National Institute of Science and Technology for Regenerative Medicine, focused on a new treatment for asthma brought on by house dust mites (HDMs). Some estimate that these common microscopic creatures are the culprit behind nearly 85 percent of all asthma attacks.

Patricia Rieken Macedo Rocco, M.D., Ph.D., was lead investigator on the study. Previous experiments tell us that a single dose of adipose tissue-derived MSCs reduced lung inflammation in asthma brought on by HDMs, but it was unable to reverse lung remodeling, she said. We wanted to see how multiple doses of MSCs might perform.

Earlier studies using bone marrow-derived MSCs also demonstrated therapeutic effects in HDM-induced allergic asthma, but the availability of these cells is limited due to the invasive procedure needed to harvest the cells. We opted for MSCs collected from human adipose tissue instead, as they can be easily obtained by liposuction, Dr. Rocco explained. Furthermore, adipose tissue is estimated to contain a greater number of MSCs compared to bone marrow, and these cells appear to be expandable to a higher number of passages, thus providing attractive advantages for use in a multiple-dose regimen.

For their study, the team used a mouse model that had been developed to be sensitive to HDMs. One group of animals received two intravenous doses of MSCs (105 cells/day) beginning 24 hours after being exposed to the mites; a second group received three doses; and a third group was administered dexamethasone, a steroid often used to treat experimental asthma. A control group was given saline only.

After seven days, the animals treated with the two and three doses of MSCs showed reduced lung inflammation and remodeling, improved lung function and T-cell immunosuppression, with the three-dose regimen proving the most effective.

MSC-induced immunosuppression has been reported in models of autoimmune disorders and in early-stage clinical trials, with some promising results for the treatment of graft versus host disease, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and other conditions. But this is the first study demonstrating that multiple doses of MSCs may induce immunosuppressive effects in experimental allergic asthma, Dr. Rocco said.

These findings should be borne in mind for future clinical trials in patients with severe asthma.

Outcomes from this study highlight the potential of mesenchymal stromal cells to reduce lung inflammation caused by asthma, which affects more than 25 million people in America alone, said Anthony Atala, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of SCTM and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Larger clinical studies will be welcomed to further verify the safety and efficacy of this treatment.

The full article, Multiple Doses of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce Immunosuppression in Experimental Asthma, can be accessed at https://stemcellsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/sctm.19-0120.

About STEM CELLS Translational Medicine: STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), co-published by AlphaMed Press and Wiley, is a monthly peer-reviewed publication dedicated to significantly advancing the clinical utilization of stem cell molecular and cellular biology. By bridging stem cell research and clinical trials, SCTM will help move applications of these critical investigations closer to accepted best practices. SCTM is the official journal partner of Regenerative Medicine Foundation.

About AlphaMed Press: Established in 1983, AlphaMed Press with offices in Durham, NC, San Francisco, CA, and Belfast, Northern Ireland, publishes two other internationally renowned peer-reviewed journals: STEM CELLS, is the world's first journal devoted to this fast paced field of research. The Oncologist (http://www.TheOncologist.com), also a monthly peer-reviewed publication, is devoted to community and hospital-based oncologists and physicians entrusted with cancer patient care. All three journals are premier periodicals with globally recognized editorial boards dedicated to advancing knowledge and education in their focused disciplines.

About Wiley: Wiley, a global company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions, help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

About Regenerative Medicine Foundation (RMF): The non-profit Regenerative Medicine Foundation fosters strategic collaborations to accelerate the development of regenerative medicine to improve health and deliver cures. RMF pursues its mission by producing its flagship World Stem Cell Summit, honouring leaders through the Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Action Awards, and promoting educational initiatives.

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Multiple Doses of Stem Cells Show Potential in Treating Severe Asthma - PR Web

Full Alliance Group Announces New EBO2 Sites in Florida and the Caribbean – P&T Community

BEVERLY HILLS, California, Nov. 21, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Full Alliance Group, Inc. (OTCPK: FAGI) is pleased to announce the opening of two new EBO2 treatment offices.

Dr. Yu and his staff arrived in Boca Raton, Florida, and then the Cayman Islands earlier this week with two brand-new portable EBO2 units and are currently training Dr. Joseph Purita and his staff. Dr. Purita is well-known in the stem cell and regenerative medicine sector and is eager to implement our ozone technology within his thriving practice.He has offices in Boca Raton as well as in the Cayman Islands.

Dr. Purita's Pensum Regenerative Clinic in Grand Cayman already specializes in stem cell treatment and anti-aging.The addition of EBO2 technology is expected to work synergistically with the well-established stem cell protocols already in place at the clinic.

"Expanding our footprint to the East and South, as well as the Caribbean, has been a critical part of our strategic plan," said Dr. Brian Volpp, MD, CEO and President of Full Alliance Group, Inc. "We are grateful that Dr. Purita has committed to the Yu Method and that he has made the financial commitment for two of our new units.His reputation within the stem cell community should allow ozone therapy to become more mainstream as he gains more experience with integrating EBO2 into his existing protocols."

Also, we have been advised by our legal team that the third quarter financial filing must be made publicly available to all shareholders. Consequently, the filing has been posted on our website:https://FullAlliance.com

About Full Alliance Group Inc.

Full Alliance Group Inc. (OTCPK: FAGI) is a multi-faceted holding company with various interests in technology, healthcare, and nutraceuticals. Nutra Yu, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Full Alliance Group, develops, markets, and distributes a proprietary line of nutraceutical products. EBO2, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Full Alliance Group, is the provider of ''EBO2'', a modern high volume blood gas exchange unit for the treatment of 5-7 liters of blood with medical ozone. The unit allows extracorporeal blood and oxygenation, ozone exposure and blood filtration.The process filters blood in a unique way by using the integrated diffusing membranes within the filter fibers to trap lipids and proteins which are in excess in the venous blood supply. The EBO2 unit is considered the world's most advanced medical ozone therapy.

For additional information regarding Full Alliance Group, visit, http://www.fullalliance.com.

Paul Brian Volpp, MD, MPH, President / CEO The Full Alliance Group

Forward-Looking StatementsThis shareholder update may contain a number of forward-looking statements. Words and variations of words such as: "expect", "goals", "could", "plans", "believe", "continue", "may", "will", and similar expressions are intended to identify our forward-looking statements, including but not limited to: our expectation for growth, benefits from brand-building, cost savings and margins. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control, which could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated in our forward-looking statements. Such factors include, but are not limited to: continued volatility of, and sharp increase in: costs/pricing actions, increased competition, ability to raise sufficient operating capital, risks from operating internationally, consumer weakness, weakness in economic conditions and tax law changes.

Full Alliance Group Inc. Investor RelationsDave DonlinEmail: Info@TheCervelleGroup.comPhone: (407) 490-6635Web: http://www.StockInvestorDaily.comVisit: http://www.fullalliance.comContact: ir@fullalliance.com

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Full Alliance Group Announces New EBO2 Sites in Florida and the Caribbean - P&T Community

Vor Biopharma and MaxCyte Announce Clinical and Commercial License Agreement for Engineered Hematopoietic Stem Cells (eHSCs) to Treat Cancer | More…

DetailsCategory: More NewsPublished on Thursday, 21 November 2019 18:22Hits: 84

- Clinical and commercial agreement using MaxCytes recently launched ExPERT platform enables up to five of Vors engineered cell therapies and includes development and approval milestones and sales-based payments

- Takes MaxCytes total number of partnered commercial licenses to seven

CAMBRIDGE, MA & GAITHERSBURG, MD, USA I November 21, 2019 I Vor Biopharma, an oncology company pioneering engineered hematopoietic stem cells (eHSCs) for the treatment of cancer, and MaxCyte, Inc., a global cell-based therapies and life sciences company, today announced a clinical and commercial license agreement under which Vor will use MaxCytes Flow Electroporation technology to produce eHSCs and initiate Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling studies to accelerate its progress towards the clinic.

Under the terms of the agreement, Vor obtains non-exclusive clinical and commercial use rights to MaxCytes Flow Electroporation technology and ExPERT platform to develop up to five engineered cell therapies, including VOR33, Vors lead eHSC candidate, which is in development for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In return, MaxCyte will receive undisclosed development and approval milestones and sales-based payments in addition to other licensing fees.

Vor will use MaxCytes cell engineering platform to deliver its gene editing machinery into hematopoietic stem cells to remove biologically redundant cell surface proteins that are also expressed on blood cancer cells. Once the eHSCs are transplanted into a cancer patient, these cells are effectively hidden from complementary targeted therapies that target the relevant protein, while diseased cells are left vulnerable to attack. Vors approach thereby could unleash the potential of targeted therapies by broadening the therapeutic window and improving the utility of complementary targeted therapies.

MaxCyte is a leader in GMP electroporation technology, and we are thrilled that this agreement provides us with long-term access to a platform technology applicable to a pipeline of eHSC programs used to treat AML and other blood cancers, said Sadik Kassim, Ph.D., Chief Technology Officer of Vor. As we build on promising in vivo data from our lead candidate VOR33, we can now expand our manufacturing capabilities to support later-stage studies, regulatory filings and commercialization of VOR33.

MaxCytes ExPERT instrument family represents the next generation of leading, clinically validated, electroporation technology for complex and scalable cellular engineering. By delivering high transfection efficiency with enhanced functionality, the ExPERT platform delivers the high-end performance essential to enable the next wave of biological and cellular therapeutics.

We look forward to expanding our relationship with Vor Biopharma as the company pioneers a potential future standard of care in hematopoietic stem cell transplants for cancer patients in need, said Doug Doerfler, President & CEO of MaxCyte. This agreement represents another key business milestone for MaxCyte, emphasizing the value of our technology platform applied to next-generation engineered cell therapies that may make a true difference in patient outcomes.

About VOR33 Vors lead product candidate, VOR33, consists of engineered hematopoietic stem cells (eHSCs) that lack the protein CD33. Once these cells are transplanted into a cancer patient, CD33 becomes a far more cancer-specific target, potentially avoiding toxicity to the normal blood and bone marrow associated with CD33-targeted therapies. In so doing, Vor aims to improve the therapeutic window and effectiveness of CD33-targeted therapies, thereby potentially broadening the clinical benefit to patients suffering from AML.

About Vor Biopharma Vor Biopharma aims to transform the lives of cancer patients by pioneering engineered hematopoietic stem cell (eHSC) therapies. By removing biologically redundant proteins from eHSCs, these cells become inherently invulnerable to complementary targeted therapies while tumor cells are left susceptible, thereby unleashing the potential of targeted therapies to benefit cancer patients in need.

Vors platform could be used to potentially change the treatment paradigm of both hematopoietic stem cell transplants and targeted therapies, such as antibody drug conjugates, bispecific antibodies and CAR-T cell treatments. A proof-of-concept study for Vors lead program has been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Vor is based in Cambridge, Mass. and has a broad intellectual property base, including in-licenses from Columbia University, where foundational work was conducted by inventor and Vor Scientific Board Chair Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD, DPhil. Vor was founded by Dr. Mukherjee and PureTech Health and is supported by leading investors including 5AM Ventures and RA Capital Management, Johnson & Johnson Innovation JJDC, Inc. (JJDC), Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research and Osage University Partners.

About MaxCyte MaxCyte is a clinical-stage global cell-based therapies and life sciences company applying its proprietary cell engineering platform to deliver the advances of cell-based medicine to patients with high unmet medical needs. MaxCyte is developing novel CARMA therapies for its own pipeline, with its first drug candidate in a Phase I clinical trial. CARMA is MaxCytes mRNA-based proprietary therapeutic platform for autologous cell therapy for the treatment of solid cancers. In addition, through its life sciences business, MaxCyte leverages its Flow Electroporation Technology to enable its biopharmaceutical partners to advance the development of innovative medicines, particularly in cell therapy. MaxCyte has placed its flow electroporation instruments worldwide, including with all of the top ten global biopharmaceutical companies. The Company now has more than 80 partnered programme licenses in cell therapy with more than 45 licensed for clinical use. With its robust delivery technology platform, MaxCyte helps its partners to unlock the full potential of their products. For more information, visit http://www.maxcyte.com.

SOURCE: MaxCyte

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Vor Biopharma and MaxCyte Announce Clinical and Commercial License Agreement for Engineered Hematopoietic Stem Cells (eHSCs) to Treat Cancer | More...

Global Cell Separation Market 2020-2024 | Evolving Opportunities with Akadeum Life Sciences and Becton, Dickinson and Co. | Technavio – Business Wire

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The global cell separation market is poised to grow by USD 7.12 billion during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of over 17% during the forecast period. Request Free Sample Pages

Read the 142-page research report with TOC on "Cell Separation Market Analysis Report by End-User (Academic institutions and research laboratories; Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies; and Hospitals and clinical testing laboratories), by Geography (North America, Europe, Asia, and ROW), and Segment Forecasts, 2020 - 2024"

The market is driven by the increasing use of cell separation in cancer research. In addition, the rising focus on personalized medicine is anticipated to further boost the growth of the cell separation market.

The increasing use of cell separation in cancer research will be one of the major drivers in the global market. Over the last few years, cell separation has been used along with imaging, proteomics, and molecular biological methods to identify and characterize cancer stem cells. This helps in the early diagnosis of tumors, monitoring of circulating tumor cells, and evaluation of intratumor heterogeneity. Also, the incidence of cancer is increasing rapidly, especially amongst women. Cervical and breast cancers are the most common types in the world. The rising incidence of cancer is encouraging further research in the field. Moreover, advances in computer techniques, optics, and lasers introduced a new generation of cell separation techniques which are capable of high speed processing of single cell suspensions. These factors will boost the global cell separation market growth during the forecast period of 2020-2024.

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Major Five Cell Separation Market Companies:

Akadeum Life Sciences

Akadeum Life Sciences owns and operates the businesses under various segments such as T cell isolation kits, B cell isolation kits, red blood cell products, Streptavidin products, and CD45 products. The product offered by the company is human T Cell isolation kit. This product uses streptavidin-conjugated BACS microbubbles and biotinylated antibodies for cell separation.

Becton, Dickinson and Co.

Becton operates the business under three segments, which include BD medical, BD life sciences, and BD interventional. The companys key offering include the BD IMag cell separation magnet. This product is used to attract labeled cells to the adjacent walls of tubes, allowing the removal of the supernatant, which contains unlabeled cells.

Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc.

Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc. has business operations under various segments, namely life science and clinical diagnostics. The product offered by the company is the ddSEQ single-cell isolator. This product is offered as an automated device to process hundreds to tens of thousands of cells per day.

Cell Microsystems, Inc.

Cell Microsystems, Inc. operates the business under three segments, which include CellRaft AIR System, CytoSort Array, and CellRaft System for inverted microscopes. The companys key offerings include the CellRaft AIR System. This product is available with an automated precision X-Y stage and a microscope with three-channel fluorescence imaging capabilities. It is designed to reduce the time taken for cell separation.

Danaher Corp.

Danaher Corp. operates the business through the following segments: Life Sciences, Diagnostics, Dental, and Environmental & Applied Solutions. The companys key offering in the cell separation market include Avanti J-26S XP. This product is offered as a centrifuge, which includes the elutriation particle separation functionality.

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Cell Separation End-User Outlook (Revenue, USD Million, 2020 - 2024)

Cell Separation Regional Outlook (Revenue, USD Million, 2020 - 2024)

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Cell Isolation Market Global Cell Isolation Market by product (consumables and instruments), end-users (AR, PB, CRO, and others), and geography (Asia, Europe, North America, and ROW).

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Global Cell Separation Market 2020-2024 | Evolving Opportunities with Akadeum Life Sciences and Becton, Dickinson and Co. | Technavio - Business Wire

Not happy with smaller paper (letter) | Letters To The Editor – LancasterOnline

Apparently LNP decided to reduce the content of the daily newspaper. The Nov. 12 Opinion section is only 1 1/2 pages long, with the LNP editorial, one colorless political cartoon and one syndicated column on A12. Following, on A13, is a half-page of letters to the editor (OK) and a half-page devoted to a silly advertisement for New Alternative to Adult Diapers.

Then, the following full page, A14, is devoted to an another advertisement for stem cell medicine for joint pain. Why these ads that most readers have no interest in? With all the events happening in our world now, why is the Nation/World news only one page some days? And why the reduction of Opinion content?

In addition, LNP has recently deleted the TV Highlights column, with its insight into upcoming programs. The Sports section is often limited to only four pages that have little insights on sport figures or Philadelphia Eagles analysis.

Also, LNP has chosen to eliminate the separate Faith & Values section on Saturday. LNP sidestepped this issue with a reply to a reader letter stating that Faith & Values now appears inside the A section on Saturday (with less content, I might add).

And what has happened that readers now have drastically reduced use of color in the LNP? To save on a small amount of colored ink?

To date, LNP has not offered me any reduced subscription rate for the much reduced content in the newspaper. Hopefully your daily editorial We believe... will provide answers as to why this is happening to your loyal customers.

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Ed Lull

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Not happy with smaller paper (letter) | Letters To The Editor - LancasterOnline

Growing at an Annualized Rate of Over 20%, The Cell Therapy Manufacturing Market is Estimated to Reach Close to USD 10 Billion by 2030, Claims Roots…

The approval of KYMRIAH, YESCARTA, Alofisel and Zyntelgo has increased the interest of pharma stakeholders in cell therapies; further, owing to the technical challenges in this field, outsourcing manufacturing operations has become a necessity

LONDON, Nov. 21, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Roots Analysishas announced the addition of "Cell Therapy Manufacturing Market (3rd Edition), 2019 - 2030" report to its list of offerings.

Owing to various reasons, the demand for cell therapies is anticipated to increase over the coming years. Therefore, both therapy developers and contract service providers may need to strengthen their capabilities and expand available capacity. In this context, automation is expected to be a key enabler within the cell therapy manufacturing and contract services industry.

To order this 500+ page report, which features 160+ figures and 250+ tables, please visit this link

Key Market Insights

More than 160 organizations claim to be engaged in cell therapy manufacturing

The market landscape is dominated by industry players, representing more than 60% of the total number of stakeholders. Amongst these, over 55 are large or mid-sized firms (having more than 50 employees).

100+ players focused on T-cell and stem cell therapies

Most of these players are focused on manufacturing T-cell therapies, including CART, TCR or TILs. It is worth highlighting that more than 35 organizations claim to have necessary capabilities for the manufacturing of both types of therapies.

Presently, 70+ companies have commercial scale capacity

As majority of the cell therapy products are in clinical trials, the demand is high at this scale. However, it is worth noting that several players (~50%) have already developed commercial scale capacity for cell therapies.

Europe is currently considered a current hub for cell therapy production

More than 220 manufacturing facilities have been established by various players, worldwide; of these, 35% are in Europe, followed by those based in North America. Other emerging regions include Australia, China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Israel.

50+ facility expansions reported between 2015-2019

More than 85% of the expansions are related to setting up of new facilities across different regions. Maximum expansion activity was observed in the US and in certain countries within the Asia Pacific regions.

20+ companies offer automated solutions to cell therapy developers

Players that claim to offer consultancy services related to automation include (in alphabetical order) Berkeley Lights, Cesca Therapeutics, Ferrologix, FluDesign Sonics, GE Healthcare and Terumo BCT. Further, we identified players,namely (in alphabetical order) Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA, Invetech, KMC Systems, Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine and RoosterBio, that offer consultancy solutions related to automation.

Partnership activity has grown at an annualized rate of 16%, between 2014 and 2018

More than 200 agreements have been inked in the last 5 years; majority of these were focused on the supply of cell-based therapy products for clinical trials. Other popular types of collaboration models include manufacturing process development agreements (16%), services agreements (12%) and acquisitions (10%).

By 2030, developed geographies will capture over 60% of the market share

Asia Pacific is anticipated to capture the major share (~36%) of the market by 2030. It is also important to highlight that financial resources, technical expertise and established infrastructure is likely to drive cell therapy manufacturing market in Europe, which is estimated to grow at a CAGR of ~26%.

To request a sample copy / brochure of this report, please visit this link

Key Questions Answered

The USD 10+ billion (by 2030) financial opportunity within the cell therapy manufacturing market has been analyzed across the following segments:

The report features inputs from eminent industry stakeholders, according to whom the manufacturing of cell therapies is largely being outsourced due to exorbitant costs associated with the setting-up of in-house expertise. The report includes detailed transcripts of discussions held with the following experts:

The research covers profiles of key players (industry and non-industry) that offer manufacturing services for cell-based therapies, featuring a company overview, information on manufacturing facilities, and recent collaborations.

For additional details, please visit

https://www.rootsanalysis.com/reports/view_document/cell-therapy-manufacturing/285.html or email sales@rootsanalysis.com

You may also be interested in the following titles:

Contact:

Gaurav Chaudhary+1(415)800-3415Gaurav.Chaudhary@rootsanalysis.com

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Growing at an Annualized Rate of Over 20%, The Cell Therapy Manufacturing Market is Estimated to Reach Close to USD 10 Billion by 2030, Claims Roots...

WCM-Q explores law and ethics of stem cells and AI in medicine – Gulf Times

The legal and ethical implications of using stem cells and artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine were discussed at the latest instalment of Weill Cornell Medicine Qatars (WCM-Q) Intersection of Law & Medicine series.Expert speakers at the event discussed the impact of recent advances in stem cell science and AI on the practice of medicine in Qatar and explored how new legal frameworks could be developed to protect the rights and safety of patients in the Mena region.The day-long event was organised by WCM-Q in collaboration with Hamad Bin Khalifa University and the University of Malaya of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Stem cells are an exciting area for medical researchers because they have the potential to repair damaged or diseased tissues in people with conditions such as Parkinsons disease, type 1 diabetes, stroke, cancer, and Alzheimers disease, among many others.Stem cells can also be used by researchers to test new drugs for safety and effectiveness.Stem cells have the capacity for unlimited or prolonged self-renewal, and they can differentiate themselves into many different cell types to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions, said Dr Amal Robay, WCM-Q assistant professor in genetic medicine and director of research compliance.The central ethical dilemma of stem cell science arises from the fact that embryonic stem cells are derived from human embryos or by cloning, she explained.Visiting bioethics expert Dr Jeremy Sugarman of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, US said that the public image of stem cell research had been damaged by a small number of high-profile cases in which scientists had behaved unethically.The field had also been hampered by different countries applying different laws to stem cell research, making international collaboration problematic, he said.Meanwhile, the use of AI in healthcare has the potential to leverage analysis of large amounts of data to improve patient outcomes, but poses ethical concerns regarding privacy, the diversity of data sources, biases and relying on non-human entities for potentially life-changing decisions.Its very important that we bridge that gap between the professions of law and medicine, and that we understand the fundamental importance of ethicists to the advance of science, said Dr Barry Solaiman, assistant professor of law in the College of Law and Public Policy at HBKU .We need to consider how lawyers can help to develop laws to ensure that science advances and that it does so in ways that protect everyone involved.The event, which was co-directed by Dr Solaiman and Dr Thurayya Arayssi, professor of clinical medicine and senior associate dean for medical education and continuing professional development at WCM-Q, also featured other expert speakers.Dr Mohamed Firdaus bin Abdul Aziz of the Faculty of Law at the University of Malaya, who spoke about stem cell regulations around the world, Dr Faisal Farooq of Qatar Computing Research Institute, who spoke about AI in healthcare, Dr Effy Vayena of the Swiss Institute of Technology on the ethical challenges of using machine learning in healthcare, Dr Sharon Kaur of the Faculty of Law at the University of Malaya on global regulation of AI, and Dr Mohamed Ghaly of Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies on Islamic perspectives of bioethics in stem cell research.The visiting experts also engaged in two panel discussions, one examining the law and ethics of stem cell science, chaired by Dr Adeeba Kamarulzaman, dean of medicine at the University of Malaya, and one on AI in healthcare chaired by Dr Thurayya Arayssi, professor of clinical medicine and senior associate dean for medical education and continuing professional development at WCM-Q.

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WCM-Q explores law and ethics of stem cells and AI in medicine - Gulf Times

New Invention of Artificial intelligence in Medicine with Stem Cells by WCM-Q – Universal News

The legalized and ethical imputations of using stem cells and artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine were discussed at the new installment of Weill Cornell Medicine Qatars (WCM-Q) Intersection of Law & Medicine series.

Skilled speakers at the event talked about the impact of current advances in stem cell science and AI on the development of medicine in Qatar and explored how the latest legal architecture could be developed to secure the rights and safety of patients in the Mena region.

The all-day-long program was organized by WCM-Q in league with Hamad Bin Khalifa University and the University of Malaya of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Stem cells are thrilling areas for medical experimentation because they have the capability to restore damaged or diseased tissues in humans with conditions such as Parkinsons disease, type 1 diabetes, stroke, cancer, and Alzheimers disease, and much more.

Stem cells can help the researchers to test new drugs for safety and effectiveness.

Stem cells have the capacity for unlimited or extended self-renewal, and they can differentiate themselves into many different cell types to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions, told Dr. Amal Robay, WCM-Q assistant professor in genetic medicine and director of research compliance.

The central ethical dilemma of stem cell science arises from the fact that embryonic stem cells are derived from human embryos or by cloning, she added.

Bioethics expert Dr. Jeremy Sugarman of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, US said that the public image of stem cell research had been damaged by a small number of high-profile cases in which scientists had behaved unethically.

The field had also been hampered by different countries applying different laws to stem cell research, making international collaboration problematic, he added.

While, the implementation of AI in Medicine has the potential to leverage analysis of huge amounts of data to improve patient outcomes, but poses ethical concerns regarding privacy, the variety of data sources, biases and relying on non-human entities for potentially life-changing decisions.

Its very important that we bridge that gap between the professions of law and medicine, and that we understand the fundamental importance of ethicists to the advance of science, toldDr. Barry Solaiman, assistant professor of law in the College of Law and Public Policy at HBKU.

We need to consider how lawyers can help to develop laws to ensure that scientific advances and that it does so in ways that protect everyone involved, he added.

The event, which was co-directed by Dr. Solaiman and Dr. Thurayya Arayssi, professor of clinical medicine and senior associate dean for medical education and continuing professional development at WCM-Q, also participated in other skilled speakers.

Dr Mohamed Firdaus bin Abdul Aziz of the Faculty of Law at the University of Malaya, who talk about stem cell regulations around the world, Dr Faisal Farooq of Qatar Computing Research Institute, who discussed about AI in healthcare, Dr Effy Vayena of the Swiss Institute of Technology on the ethical challenges of using machine learning in medicine, Dr Sharon Kaur of the Faculty of Law at the University of Malaya on global regulation of AI, and Dr Mohamed Ghaly of Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies on Islamic concept of bioethics in stem cell research.

The visiting professors also contributed in two panel discussions, one examining the law and ethics of stem cell science, managed by Dr. Adeeba Kamarulzaman, dean of medicine at the University of Malaya, and another on AI in healthcare managed by Dr Thurayya Arayssi, professor of clinical medicine and senior associate dean for medical education and continuing professional development at WCM-Q.

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New Invention of Artificial intelligence in Medicine with Stem Cells by WCM-Q - Universal News

Global Regenerative Medicine Market to Grow Over $81 Billion by 2023 and Market Driven by Stem Cells – PharmiWeb.com

PUNE, India, Nov. 13, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- This report provides a comprehensive overview of the size of the regenerative medicine market, segmentation of the market (stem cells, tissue engineering and CAR-T therapy), key players and the vast potential of therapies that are in clinical trials.The analysis indicates that the global Regenerative Medicine Market was worth $28 billion in 2018 and will grow to over $81 billion by 2023, with a CAGR of 23.3% between this time frame. Within this market, the stem cell industry will grow significantly. This report describes the evolution of such a huge market in 15 chapters supported by over 350 tables and figures in 700 pages report at https://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/974420-global-regenerative-medicine-market-analysis-forecast-to-2021-stem-cells-tissue-engineering-biobanking-car-t-industries.html

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Executive Summary

Regenerative medicine's main objective is to heal and replace organs/cells that have been damaged by age, trauma or disease. Congenital defects can also be addressed with regenerative medicine. Therefore, it's market encompasses dermal wounds, cardiovascular disease, specific cancer types and organ replacement. To that end, regenerative medicine is a broader field and manipulates the body's immune system and regeneration potential to achieve its requirement. Financially speaking, investment into this space is dominated by grants, private investors and publicly traded stocks. Looking forward, the regenerative medicine market is promising for a number of robust reasons including:

Of course restrictions to this market include strict regulations in certain geographies, and also the level of investment required to support R&D, clinical research, trials and commercialization. Reimbursement strategies are also paramount to success of the overall space.

There are over 700 regenerative medicine companies globally at present. At present, the total regenerative medicine market has more than 500 products commercialized. The Regenerative Medicine Marketencompasses a number of key technology submarkets including:

Reconstructive surgeries for bones and joints is the mainstay of the regenerative medicine market. Geographically speaking, due to the dominance of the bone and joint reconstruction market, the US has the biggest space. This is followed by Europe. However, due to recent positive legislation in Japan and Europe, the stem cell arena will grow more substantially in these regions over the next five years. By 2023, it is possible that Europe will surpass the US market with respect to stem cell applications, and this will become more likely if the Trump Administration restricts legislation and funding.

Market Applications & Opportunities for Regenerative Therapies

Regenerative medicine, including cellular and gene therapies will have a significant impact on the expenditure of payers once reimbursement schemes are optimized. To that end, a number of conditions that regenerative medicine tackles is synonymous with an aging population such as:

Global Financial Landscape

The last few years have been busy for regeneration medicine, cellular therapeutics and the gene therapy industry, with high investment from pharma giants such as Eli Lilly, BMS, Astra Zeneca and Sanofi. Company partnerships were also in motion that included Kite Pharma and Bluebird/Five Prime, Juno and Fate Therapeutics/ Editas Medicine.

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Stem Cell Market Analysis & Forecast to 2023

Today the stem cell and regenerative medicine industries are interlinked and over the last number of years have grown substantially. Regenerative medicine replaces or regenerates cells, tissues or organs and in order to achieve this, uses produces from the pharmaceutical, biologics, medical device and cell therapy spaces. Therefore, cell therapy and stem cells come under the umbrella market of regenerative medicine. Cell therapy is a platform by which regenerative medicine can achieve its aim and concentrates on using cells as therapeutics to treat disease.

Tissue Engineering Market Analysis and Forecast to 2023

Tissue engineering was the forerunner of the present regenerative medicine market. The area of biomaterials was developed to use cells and biological material and incorporate them into scaffolds and functional tissues. Some of the main applications of tissue engineered products include artificial skin and cartilage and so this area dominates the dermatology, bone and joint submarket. Wound repair is also a significant area for tissue engineering, with products such as Dermagraft in the market.

Tissue engineering is being driven by the increase in technology of biomaterials, bioscaffolds and bio 3D printing. The rise in the amount of orthopedic transplantations is demanding the market to produce more innovative solutions such as 3D printed organs. In the long term future, Kelly Scientific forecasts the advance of cutting edge 3D bioprinters in this market place.

Biobanking Market Analysis

The biobanking industry is made up of over 500 public and private blood banks globally. These companies and institutions collect, store and distribute adipose tissue, cord blood and birth tissues, musculoskeletal tissues, pericardium, skin, bone, vascular tissue, autologous and allogeneic cells and other biological samples. They operate by charging a collection fee and then a storage fee, which is usually operational for 20 years. Private banking costs between $1,350 to $2,300 as an initial fee, and then between $100 to $175 per annum for storage. Public banking is free, and a number of hybrid models have been introduced in Europe and Asia to date.

CAR-T Industry

The CAR-T industry is addressing unmet needs in specific relapsed cancers, however does early clinical trial data support a blockbuster status for this upcoming therapy? Some patients do indeed show long term activity and high remission rates, but there is a large proportion of patients with toxicities such as cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. The main players within the CAR-T market are Juno Therapeutics, Kite Pharma, Novartis and Cellectis. The market is moving ahead, backed by years of R&D, from both academia and industry, investors capital and small clinical studies. From 2017, Kelly Scientific forecasts that CAR-T therapy will become more streamlined, with faster manufacturing times as advances in technologies take hold and clinical trials provide more robust evidence that this immunotherapy is robust. These factors, plus strategies to reduce adverse reactions and toxicities and larger players like Novartis taking stage will push CAR-T therapy ahead. However, recent deaths in the Juno ROCKET trial are creating questions amongst investors. How will the CAR-T space influence the total immunotherapy industry going forward? This comprehensive report scrutinizes the total market and provides cutting-edge insights and analysis.

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Key Questions Answered

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4th Annual MarketsandMarkets Bioprocessing of Advanced Cellular Therapies & Regenerative Medicine Congress

Date: 10th 11th March 2020Location: London UK

In the 4th edition of MarketsandMarkets Bioprocessing of Advanced Cellular Therapies & Regenerative Medicine we would be focusing on the pre-clinical, manufacturing, clinical and regulatory aspects of cell therapies and regenerative medicine. This Congress event will be held on 10th and 11th March 2020 in London -UK

Regenerative therapies are proving its acceptance in potential of cell-based therapies for chronic disorders. Since our past three editions, our aim through this conference is to provide illustrative approach to recent developments in technologies of bioprocessing of cellular therapies, to process development and addressing qualitative and regulatory hurdles.

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Global Regenerative Medicine Market to Grow Over $81 Billion by 2023 and Market Driven by Stem Cells - PharmiWeb.com

Introducing the Targeted Anticancer Therapies and Precision Medicine in Cancer Collection – PLoS Blogs

While the rate of death from cancer has been declining since the 1990s, an estimated 9.6 million people died from cancer in 2018, making it the second-leading cause of death worldwide [1]. According to the NCI Cancer Trends Progress Report, in the United States, the incidence and death rates of some cancer types have also been increasing. Together, these facts indicate that despite tremendous recent progress, the research community unfortunately still has a long list of tasks to complete to end global suffering from cancer.

The clinical management of cancer has long been rooted in morphological and histopathological analyses for diagnosis, and the triad of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation for treatment. However, we are quickly moving towards a pervasive reliance on high resolution, high throughput, molecular marker-based diagnostic as well as precision-targeted therapeutic modalities. The progressive development of the paradigm that defined molecular drivers of cancer has exposed therapeutic vulnerabilities; for example, the BCR-ABL1 gene fusion in chronic myeloid leukemia, KIT mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors, ERBB2 amplification in a subset of breast cancers, or EGFR mutations and ALK/ ROS/ RET gene fusions in lung cancers to name a few. Fueled by advances in high-throughput sequencing, it is increasingly practical (and arguably affordable) to systematically pursue Targeted Anticancer Therapies and Precision Medicine in Cancer.

PLOS ONE, together with PLOS Computational Biology, launched a Call for Papers earlier this year to increase understanding of this clinically important area. The scope of this call encompassed four areas: identification and classification of driver genes and somatic alterations; target and drug discovery; mechanisms of drug resistance; and early detection and screening.

Today, we are very happy to announce the launch of the resulting Collection. Featuring an initial set of nearly two dozen papers, with more to be added as they are published, these articles represent diverse facets of ongoing efforts in this area, where general knowledge of cancers serves to inform individual patients care, and at the same time particulars from individual cancer cases contribute to improved resolution of our general knowledge pool.

Somatic aberrations that are critical to the development, growth and progression of cancer are defined as drivers that are typically accompanied by large numbers of incidental aberrations referred to as passengers, acquired in the tumors due to the general chromosomal instability characteristic of advanced cancers. Distinguishing driver aberrations from passengers in individual tumors represents an active area of research that involves development of smarter analytical algorithms, as well as definitive functional characterization of candidate aberrations.

Emilie A. Chapeau et al. developed a conditional inducible transgenic JAK2V617F mouse model that recapitulates aspects of human myeloproliferative neoplasms, including splenomegaly, erythroid expansion and hyperproliferation of bone marrow, with some intriguing differences seen between male and female mice. Importantly, the disease phenotype was reversible when transgene expression was switched off. This work underscores the key role for JAK2V617F in the initiation and maintenance of myeloproliferative neoplasms, and suggests that inhibitors specific to this JAK2 mutation might be efficacious in this disease [2].

Using targeted exon sequencing and array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), Gayle Pageau Pouliot et al. identified monoallelic mutations in Fanconi-BRCA pathway genes in samples collected from children with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). These mutations appeared to arise in early stages of tumorigenesis, suggesting a potential role for Fanconi-BRCA pathway insufficiency in the initiation of T-ALL. Although PARP inhibitors did not affect viability of isolated T-ALL cells with monoallelic Fanconi-BRCA mutations, these cells were hypersensitive to UV irradiation in vitro or ATR inhibition in vivo, suggesting that ATR inhibitors might have therapeutic value in T-ALL [3].

Three papers in this Collection examine links between genetic alterations and prognosis. Sumadi Lukman Anwar et al. report that LINE-1 hypomethylation in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples correlates with malignant transformation, decreased overall survival and increased tumor size [4]. Investigating HER2-positive breast cancer specimens, Arsalan Amirfallah et al. found that high levels of vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) could potentially contribute to cancer progression and might be a marker of poor prognosis [5]. Finally, in their systematic review and meta-analysis, Chia Ching Lee et al. identified low discordance rates in EGFR mutations between primary lung tumors and distant metastases, although they note some differences depending on metastatic site. Notably, discordance rates appear to be higher in bone metastases compared to central nervous system or lung metastases [6]. These studies provide much-needed leads for the potential development of new diagnostic tests or targeted therapies.

Precision therapy of cancers is premised on the identification of tumor-specific driver aberrations that are necessary for tumor growth and survival. These aberrations represent potential therapeutic targets. While matching therapeutics have been developed for some of the tumor-specific targets, particularly many oncogenic kinases, a large number of defined driver aberrations remain in search of effective therapies. Drug discovery efforts to match defined targets represent a vigorous area of ongoing research with implications for survival and quality of lives of cancer patients worldwide. The development of drugs to treat cancers driven by transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, and epigenetic modulators has proved particularly challenging. On the other hand, recent development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches has spurred research to identify potential targets and matching drug discovery efforts.

This Collection highlights several interesting new strategies to identify potential lead compounds for cancer treatment. Thomas W. Miller et al. describe the development of a biochemical quantitative high-throughput screen for small molecules that disrupt the interaction between CD47 and SIRP. Preclinical studies have shown that disrupting this interaction may provide a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. Small molecular inhibitors that specifically target the interaction between CD47 and SIRP are potentially advantageous over biologics that target CD47, because they might have less on target toxicologic issues and greater tissue penetrance [7].

Work from Gabrielle Choonoo, Aurora S. Blucher et al. examines the feasibility of repurposing existing cancer drugs for new indications. The authors compiled information about somatic mutations and copy-number alterations in over 500 cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and mapped these data to potential drugs listed in the Cancer Targetome [8]. This approach uncovered pathways that are routinely dysregulated in HNSCC and for which potential anti-cancer therapies are already available, as well as those for which no therapies exist. The work opens new therapeutic avenues in the treatment of this disease and also illuminates which pathways could be prioritized for the development of therapies [9].

Another important approach in extending the clinical utility of existing anti-cancer drugs is to determine whether they are effective in other settings. Indeed, Kirti Kandhwal Chahal et al. have demonstrated that the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib, which is approved for use in chronic myeloid leukemia, binds the Smoothened receptor and inhibits Hedgehog pathway signaling. Nilotinib decreased viability of hedgehog-dependent medulloblastoma cell lines in vitro and in patient-derived xenografts in vivo, suggesting that nilotinib might be an effective therapy in Hedgehog-dependent cancer [10]. (Check out the authors preprint of this article on bioRxiv.) Darcy Welch, Elliot Kahen et al. took a different approach to identify new tricks for old drugs. By testing two-drug combinations of five established (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, etoposide, irinotecan) and two experimental chemotherapeutics (the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) inhibitor SP2509 and the HDAC inhibitor romidepsin), they found that combining SP2509 with topoisomerase inhibitors or romidepsin synergistically decreased the viability of Ewing sarcoma cell lines in vitro [11].

Two papers in this collection describe potential new therapeutic approaches in cancer. Vagisha Ravi et al. developed a liposome-based delivery mechanism for a small interfering RNA targeting ferritin heavy chain 1 (FTH1) and showed that this increased radiosensitivity and decreased viability in a subpopulation of glioma initiating cells (GICs) [12]. Yongli Li et al. identified 2-pyridinealdehyde hydrazone dithiocarbamate S-propionate podophyllotoxin ester, a podophyllotoxin derivative that inhibits matrix metalloproteinases and Topoisomerase II. Treatment with this compound decreased the migration and invasion of human liver cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as growth of HepG2-derived tumors in mouse xenografts [13].

The success of precision cancer therapy targeting defined somatic aberrations is hampered by an almost inevitable, eventual treatment failure due to the emergence of drug resistance. Resistance often involves new mutations in the therapeutic target itself, or it may result due to activation of alternative pathways. Identification and therapeutic targeting of drug resistant clones represents an ongoing research problem with important practical implications for the clinical management of cancer.

Afatinib is a pan-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) inhibitor under investigation as a potential therapeutic option for people with gastric cancer; however, preclinical studies have found that some gastric cancer cell lines are resistant to afatinib treatment. Karolin Ebert et al. identify a potential mechanism behind this lack of response, demonstrating that siRNA-mediated knockdown of the receptor tyrosine kinase MET increases afatinib sensitivity of a gastric cancer cell line containing a MET amplification. As upregulation of MET has been linked to resistance to anti-HER therapies in other cancers, these findings support a role for MET in afatinib resistance in gastric cancer and suggest that combined afatinib and anti-MET therapy might be clinically beneficial for gastric cancer patients [14].

Identifying mechanisms to circumvent drug resistance is critically important to improve response and extend survival, but it is equally important to identify individuals who could be at risk of not responding to anti-cancer therapeutics. Lucas Maahs, Bertha E. Sanchez et al. report progress towards this end, showing that high expression of class III -tubulin in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) correlated with decreased overall survival and worse response rate (as measured by changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels) in CRPC patients who received docetaxel therapy. The development of a biomarker indicating potential treatment resistance to docetaxel could help develop treatment plans with the best chance of success [15].

The converse approach identifying biomarkers that correlate with drug sensitivity could help distinguish subsets of patients who would benefit most from a certain anti-cancer therapy. Kevin Shee et al. mined publicly available datasets to identify genes whose expression correlate with sensitivity and response to chemotherapeutics and found that expression of Schlafen Family Member 11 (SLFN11) correlates with better response to a variety of DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics in several types of solid tumors [16]. Separately, Jason C. Poole et al. validated the use of the Target Selector ctDNA assay, a technology developed by their group that allows the specific amplification of very low frequency mutant alleles in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA). Testing for EGFR, BRAF and KRAS mutations yielded a very high, >99% analytical sensitivity and specificity with the capability of single mutant copy detection, indicating that accurate molecular disease management over time is possible with this minimally invasive method [17].

Work from Georgios Kaissis, Sebastian Ziegelmayer, Fabian Lohfe et al. uses a machine learning algorithm to differentiate subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma based on 1,606 different radiomic features. Intriguingly, the subtypes identified in their analysis correlated with response to chemotherapeutic regimens and overall survival [18]. An imaging approach taken by Seo Young Kang et al. demonstrates the potential power of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT scans in determining the response of people with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer to radioactive iodine treatment [19].

Since cancer growth and development accrues progressive accumulation of somatic aberrations, early detection holds the promise of more effective interventions. Similarly, screening of at risk demographics has been found effective in preventing or better managing cancer care, as exemplified by the significant reduction in cases of cervical cancer after the introduction of the Pap smear as well as human papillomavirus (HPV) testing.

Biomarker development is also critically important for the early detection of cancer and metastatic disease; moreover, biomarkers are being identified that can provide insight into patient prognosis. Several papers in this Collection report interesting findings in the area of biomarker development. A report from Lingyun Xu et al. describes a magneto-nanosensor-based multiplex assay that measures circulating levels of PSA and four proteins associated with prostate cancer. This approach segregates people with prostate cancer from those with benign prostate hyperplasia with high sensitivity and specificity [20].

Two articles provide new insight into markers of disease progression and survival. Vidya Balagopal et al. report the development of a 22-gene hybrid-capture next generation sequencing panel to identify measurable residual disease in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In their retrospective study, the panel was effective at detecting evidence for residual disease. Importantly, it correctly identified patients who had never relapsed in that no evidence of residual disease was detected in any of these respective samples. Once validated, this approach could potentially be useful in monitoring patients with AML to ensure that recurrence or relapse is identified as soon as possible [21]. Separately, Yoon-Sim Yap et al. use a label-free microfluidic platform to capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from people with breast cancer and show that absolute numbers of CTCs predict progression-free survival with higher levels of CTCs correlating with a worse prognosis [22].

Finally, Lucia Suzuki et al. report findings into a potential role for the intestinal stem cell marker olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a biomarker for metastasis in esophageal adenocarcinoma. The authors found that OLFM4 expression was not significantly associated with disease-free or overall survival; however, low OLFM4 expression was detected in poorly differentiated early and advanced-stage esophageal adenocarcinoma and was an independent prognostic variable for lymph node metastasis [23].

This collection of studies encompassing the range of research topics under the banner of targeted anticancer therapies highlights the diversity, complexity and inter-disciplinary nature of research efforts actively contributing to our collective knowledge base with the hope to positively impact the lives of all cancer patients.

We would like to thank all Academic Editors and reviewers for their expert evaluation of the articles in this Collection as well as the authors for their contributions to this field. Special thanks to Senior Editor, Team Manager Emily Chenette for her invaluable help and guidance in publishing this Collection.

Andrew Cherniack

Andrew Cherniack is a group leader in the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and in the Department of Medical Oncology at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. He led the Broad Institutes effort to analyze somatic DNA copy number alterations for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and is now co-principal investigator of the Broad Institutes copy number Genome Data Analysis Center for the National Cancer Institutes Genomic Data Analysis Network (GDAN). He also leads the oncoming effort to identify new cancer therapeutic targets for the partnership with Bayer. Prior to joining the Broad Institute in 2010, Dr. Cherniack worked in both academia and industry, with a 9-year tenure at the Abbott Bioresearch Center following a similar time period in the Program in Molecular Medicine at UMass Medical School, where he was a postdoctoral researcher and a research assistant professor. Dr. Cherniack holds a Ph.D. in molecular genetics from Ohio State University and a B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania.

Anette Duensing

Anette Duensing is an Assistant Professor of Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and a Member of the Cancer Therapeutics Program at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Hillman Cancer Center. Dr. Duensings research focuses on bone and soft tissue sarcomas with the goal of identifying novel therapeutic approaches that target the underlying molecular biology of these malignancies. Her special interest and expertise are in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), a sarcoma characterized by mutations in the KIT or PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinases and the first solid tumor entity that was successfully treated with small molecule kinase inhibitors. Dr. Duensing holds an M.D. degree from the University of Hannover School of Medicine, Germany, and was a research scholar of the Dr. Mildred Scheel Stiftung fr Krebsforschung (German Cancer Aid/Deutsche Krebshilfe) at Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School. She is the recipient of an AACR Scholar-in-Training Award (AACR-AstraZeneca), a Young Investigator Award from The Liddy Shriver Sarcoma Initiative, a UPCI Junior Scholar Award, a Jeroen Pit Science Award, a Research Award from the GIST Group Switzerland and was named Hillman Fellow for Innovative Cancer Research. Dr. Duensing is co-founder and leader of the Pittsburgh Sarcoma Research Collaborative (PSaRC), a highly translational, interdisciplinary sarcoma research program. She is also affiliated with the Department of Urology at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. Dr. Duensing is an Academic Editor for PLOS ONE and author of nearly 70 original articles, reviews and book chapters.

Steven G. Gray

Steven Gray graduated from Trinity College Dublin in 1992. He joined the laboratory of Tomas J. Ekstrm at the Karolinska Institute (Sweden) in 1996 and received his PhD in 2000. He moved to the Van Andel Research Institute in Michigan, USA where he continued his studies on the therapeutic potential of histone deacetylase inhibitors in the treatment of cancer. He also spent time as a visiting fellow at Harvard Medical School, Boston working on epigenetic therapies for neurodegenerative disease. Returning to Europe, Dr. Gray spent some time at the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ Heidelberg), and subsequently moved to Copenhagen to work for Novo Nordisk as part of the research team of Prof Pierre De Meyts at the Hagedorn Research Institute working on epigenetic mechanisms underpinning diabetes pathogenesis. Dr. Gray is currently a senior clinical scientist at St Jamess Hospital at the Thoracic Oncology Research Group at St. Jamess Hospital. He holds adjunct positions at both Trinity College Dublin (senior clinical lecturer with the Dept. of Clinical Medicine), and at Technical University Dublin (adjunct senior lecturer, School of Biology DIT). Dr. Gray has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles, 15 book chapters and has edited 1 book. Research in Dr Grays laboratory focuses on Receptor Tyrosine Kinases as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of mesothelioma; epigenetic mechanisms underpinning drug resistance in lung cancer; targeting epigenetic readers, writers and erasers for the treatment of mesothelioma and thoracic malignancy; circulating tumour cells; and non-coding RNA repertoires in mesothelioma and thoracic malignancy.

Sunil Krishnan

Sunil Krishnan is the Director of the Center for Radiation Oncology Research and the John E. and Dorothy J. Harris Professor of Gastrointestinal Cancer in the department of Radiation Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He received his medical degree from Christian Medical College, Vellore, India and completed a radiation oncology residency at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. In the clinic, he treats patients with hepatobiliary, pancreatic and rectal tumors with radiation therapy. His laboratory has developed new strategies and tools to define the roles and mechanisms of radiation sensitization with gold nanoparticles, chemotherapeutics, biologics and botanicals. Dr. Krishnan serves as the co-chair of the gastrointestinal scientific program committee of ASTRO, co-chair of the gastrointestinal translational research program of RTOG, consultant to the IAEA for rectal and liver cancers, chair of the NCI pancreatic cancer radiotherapy working group, and Fellow of the American College of Physicians. He has co-authored over 200 peer-reviewed scientific publications, co-authored 17 book chapters, and co-edited 3 books.

Chandan Kumar-Sinha

Chandan Kumar-Sinha is a Research Associate Scientist in the Department of Pathology at the University of Michigan. He obtained Masters in Biotechnology from Madurai Kamraj University, and PhD in Plant Molecular Biology from Indian Institute of Science. He completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, where he worked on genomic profiling of cancers. Thereafter, he joined the Advanced Center for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer in India as a faculty member. After establishing a cancer genomics group there, he moved back to the University of Michigan to pursue translational cancer research. Dr. Kumar-Sinhas current research involves integrative clinical sequencing using high-throughput genome and transcriptome analyses to inform precision oncology. He has authored over 50 peer-reviewed publications, two book chapters, and is named co-inventor on a patent on prostate cancer biomarkers.

Gayle E. Woloschak

Gayle Woloschak is Professor of Radiation Oncology, Radiology, and Cell and Molecular Biology in the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University. Dr. Woloschak received her Ph.D. in Medical Sciences from the University of Toledo (Medical College of Ohio). She did her postdoctoral training at the Mayo Clinic, and then moved to Argonne National Laboratory until 2001. Her scientific interests are predominantly in the areas of molecular biology, radiation biology, and nanotechnology studies, and she has authored over 200 papers. She is a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection, the International Commission on Radiation Protection and numerous other committees and also serves on the US delegation to the United National Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

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Introducing the Targeted Anticancer Therapies and Precision Medicine in Cancer Collection - PLoS Blogs