Category Archives: Stem Cell Medical Center

World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers Provides Exceptional Regenerative Treatment Options To Those in Need – GlobeNewswire

October 16, 2020 12:00 ET | Source: World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers

PITTSBURGH, Oct. 16, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Those who are looking for an alternative treatment option when compared to traditional medicine are now in luck. Recently, World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers announced that it was opening the first of its more than 300 planned locations all over the world. With access to a wide range of treatment options, it is possible for patients to visit World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers and enjoy a more comprehensive recovery process than they ever have in the past. Therefore, it is important to highlight some of the major benefits that come with visiting World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers or health treatment options.

An Introduction to World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers: The First Location is Open

Right now, the first location has opened for World Wide Stem Cell. This treatment center location is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Currently, more than 300 locations are scheduled to open worldwide.

In many situations, treatment options from World Wide Stem Cell can actually work very well when working in combination with traditional medical therapy. The goal of World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers is to provide patients with more options, allowing them to tailor their treatment options to meet their individual needs and avoid invasive surgery whenever possible. In this manner, patients can work with the professionals at World Wide Stem Cell to develop a custom treatment plan to meet their unique needs.

Who Might Need Stem Cell Therapy from World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers?

The reality is that anyone is able to benefit from stem cell therapy from World Wide Stem Cell. At the same time, it is also important for people to know what goes into stem cell therapy.

First, one of the most common patient populations that might benefit from a visit to World Wide Stem Cell is athletes who have suffered an injury. While participating in their sport. While sports are great for conditioning and staying in shape. Injuries are always a very real risk. When an athlete suffers an injury, World Wide Stem Cell is able to treat that athlete and in most cases have that athlete participating back in his sport again in up to 1/10th of the time without invasive surgery. So with that being said the entire population at one time or another are candidates for stem cells. Whether it be a knee, hip, shoulder or any other orthopedic joint. Stem cells in most cases are able to replace invasive surgery; with a stem cell injection. World Wide Stem Cell always treats every condition with the proper cells for that particular situation. We only use orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons that do all our injections and they are all done with ultrasound guided needle injections. Whether you are interested in orthopedic treatments, facial rejuvenation, anti-aging cells, hair replacement, erectile dysfunction. We have them all at World Wide Stem Cell. Call, email, inquire!

Contact:

300 Chapel Harbor Drive Suite 204 Pittsburgh, Pa 15238 Contact: JS Genslinger (founder) 412-408-3183

World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, UNITED STATES

Formats available:

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World Wide Stem Cell Treatment Centers Provides Exceptional Regenerative Treatment Options To Those in Need - GlobeNewswire

Proposition 14: Stem cell research bonds City Times – City Times

New bonds would continue to fund an existing institute

Brandon Manus

California is voting on selling $5.5 billion in new bonds for research and development of stem cell research. Graphic by Brandon Manus

Brandon Manus, Staff Writer October 15, 2020

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California is voting on selling $5.5 billion in new bonds to continue funding grants for research and development of stem cell treatments.

A yes vote on this measure means Proposition 14 would issue $5.5 billion in funding to an existing state stem cell research institute. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, based in Oakland, was created in a 2004 voter-approved measure to support scientific research toward finding treatments and a deeper understanding of diseases such as Alzheimers, heart disease, cancer and strokes. Voters originally approved $3 billion, but that money is now on its last legs. As of June 2020, only $30 million remained.

A no vote on this measure means the state could not sell $5.5 billion in bonds primarily for stem cell research and the development of new medical treatments in California. Some opponents say the institute hasnt produced the kind of life-saving treatments that were promised when it was created. There is also no longer a ban on federal funding for stem cell research, which led to the institutes creation in 2004. The institute is funded with public money, but does not have any legislative oversight or address potential conflicts of interest. Some opponents have also criticized the requirement that $1.5 billion be cordoned off for brain and central nervous system diseases, saying it hampers the institutes flexibility to respond to changing needs.

Vote No on Prop. 14, a costly, unnecessary bond measure, The Sun (article) Stem-cell agency doesnt merit additional funding, The Mercury News (article)Why Prop. 14 is unaffordable, unnecessary, fatally flawed and unsupportable, The San Diego Union-Tribune (article) What Proposition 14 Tells Us About California, The New York Times (article) More borrowing for stem cell research, Los Angeles Times (article)

Californians for Stem Cell Research California Democratic Party Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation University of California Board of Regents Californians For Stem Cell Research

Marcy Darnovsky, executive director of the Center for Genetics and Society

For more information about Prop 14, go to Ballotpedia.org.

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Proposition 14: Stem cell research bonds City Times - City Times

BrainStorm Announces Financial Results for the Third Quarter of 2020 and Provides a Corporate Update – PRNewswire

NEW YORK, Oct. 15, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: BCLI), a leading developer of cellular therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, announced today financial results for the third quarter ended September 30, 2020, and provided a corporate update.

"The most important near-term event for BrainStorm will be the upcoming top-line data readout for the NurOwn Phase 3 trial in ALS, expected by the end of November. A successful outcome will set us on the path to filing a Biologic License Application (BLA) for what we believe will be a valuable new treatment for ALS," said Chaim Lebovits, Chief Executive Officer of BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics. "In parallel to our preparations for upcoming data read out, we are very busy planning and executing on other pre-BLA activities. On the management front, we appointed William K. White and Dr. Anthony Waclawski, adding valuable commercial and regulatory expertise to our leadership team. This expertise will be crucial as we work towards obtaining regulatory approval for NurOwn and ensuring that, if approved, it will be readily accessible to ALS patients in need of new treatment options for this devastating disease."

NurOwn has an innovative mechanism of action that is broadly applicable across neurodegenerative diseases and BrainStorm continues to invest in clinical trials evaluating the product in conditions beyond ALS to maximize value creation for its various stakeholders. The company remains on track to complete dosing in its Phase 2 clinical trial in progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS) by the end of 2020. In addition, the Company recently unveiled a clinical development program in Alzheimer's' disease (AD) and is planning a Phase 2 proof-of-concept clinical trial at several leading AD centers in the Netherlands and France.

Third Quarter 2020 and Recent Corporate Highlights:

Presented at the following Investor Conferences:

Cash and Liquidity as of October 14, 2020

Total available funding as of October 14, 2020, which includes cash, cash equivalents and short-term bank deposits of approximately $33.1 million as well as remaining non-dilutive funding from CIRM, IIA and other grants, amounts to approximately $36 million.

Financial Results for the Three Months Ended September 30, 2020

Conference Call & WebcastThursday, October 15, 2020 at 8 a.m. Eastern TimeFrom the US:877-407-9205 International: 201-689-8054 Webcast:https://www.webcaster4.com/Webcast/Page/2354/37811

Replays, available through October 29, 2020 From the US:877-481-4010 International: 919-882-2331 Replay Passcode: 37811

About NurOwn

NurOwn (autologous MSC-NTF) cells represent a promising investigational therapeutic approach to targeting disease pathways important in neurodegenerative disorders. MSC-NTF cells are produced from autologous, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that have been expanded and differentiated ex vivo. MSCs are converted into MSC-NTF cells by growing them under patented conditions that induce the cells to secrete high levels of neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Autologous MSC-NTF cells can effectively deliver multiple NTFs and immunomodulatory cytokines directly to the site of damage to elicit a desired biological effect and ultimately slow or stabilize disease progression. BrainStorm has fully enrolled a Phase 3 pivotal trial of autologous MSC-NTF cells for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). BrainStorm also recently received acceptance from theU.S. Food and Drug Administration(FDA) to initiate a Phase 2 open-label multicenter trial in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) and completed enrollment inAugust 2020.

About BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc.

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc.is a leading developer of innovative autologous adult stem cell therapeutics for debilitating neurodegenerative diseases. The Company holds the rights to clinical development and commercialization of the NurOwn technology platform used to produce autologous MSC-NTF cells through an exclusive, worldwide licensing agreement. Autologous MSC-NTF cells have received Orphan Drug status designation from theU.S. Food and Drug Administration(FDA) and theEuropean Medicines Agency(EMA) for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). BrainStorm has fully enrolled a Phase 3 pivotal trial in ALS (NCT03280056), investigating repeat-administration of autologous MSC-NTF cells at sixU.S.sites supported by a grant from theCalifornia Institute for Regenerative Medicine(CIRM CLIN2-0989). The pivotal study is intended to support a filing forU.S.FDA approval of autologous MSC-NTF cells in ALS. BrainStorm also recently receivedU.S.FDA clearance to initiate a Phase 2 open-label multicenter trial in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). The Phase 2 study of autologous MSC-NTF cells in patients with progressive MS (NCT03799718) completed enrollment inAugust 2020. For more information, visit the company's website atwww.brainstorm-cell.com.

Safe-Harbor Statement

Statements in this announcement other than historical data and information, including statements regarding future clinical trial enrollment and data, constitute "forward-looking statements" and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc.'s actual results to differ materially from those stated or implied by such forward-looking statements. Terms and phrases such as "may", "should", "would", "could", "will", "expect", "likely", "believe", "plan", "estimate", "predict", "potential", and similar terms and phrases are intended to identify these forward-looking statements. The potential risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, BrainStorm's need to raise additional capital, BrainStorm's ability to continue as a going concern, regulatory approval of BrainStorm's NurOwn treatment candidate, the success of BrainStorm's product development programs and research, regulatory and personnel issues, development of a global market for our services, the ability to secure and maintain research institutions to conduct our clinical trials, the ability to generate significant revenue, the ability of BrainStorm's NurOwn treatment candidate to achieve broad acceptance as a treatment option for ALS or other neurodegenerative diseases, BrainStorm's ability to manufacture and commercialize the NurOwn treatment candidate, obtaining patents that provide meaningful protection, competition and market developments, BrainStorm's ability to protect our intellectual property from infringement by third parties, heath reform legislation, demand for our services, currency exchange rates and product liability claims and litigation,; and other factors detailed in BrainStorm's annual report on Form 10-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q available athttp://www.sec.gov. These factors should be considered carefully, and readers should not place undue reliance on BrainStorm's forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are based on the beliefs, expectations and opinions of management as of the date of this press release. We do not assume any obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect actual results or assumptions if circumstances or management's beliefs, expectations or opinions should change, unless otherwise required by law. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements.

ContactsInvestor Relations: Corey Davis, Ph.D. LifeSci Advisors, LLC Phone: +1 646-465-1138 [emailprotected]

Media:Paul Tyahla SmithSolve Phone: + 1.973.713.3768 [emailprotected]

BRAINSTORM CELL THERAPEUTICS INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS U.S. dollars in thousands (Except share data)

September30,

December31,

2020

2019

U.S.$ inthousands

Unaudited

Audited

ASSETS

Current Assets:

Cash and cash equivalents

$

24,770

$

536

Short-term deposit (Note 4)

4,038

33

Other accounts receivable

1,473

2,359

Prepaid expenses and other current assets (Note 5)

56

432

Total current assets

30,337

3,360

Long-Term Assets:

Prepaid expenses and other long-term assets

27

32

Operating lease right of use asset (Note 6)

1,377

2,182

Property and Equipment, Net

950

960

Total Long-Term Assets

2,354

3,174

Total assets

$

32,691

$

6,534

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

Current Liabilities:

Accounts payable

$

3,283

$

14,677

Accrued expenses

917

1,000

Operating lease liability (Note 6)

1,216

1,263

Other accounts payable

1,013

714

Total current liabilities

6,429

17,654

Long-Term Liabilities:

Operating lease liability (Note 6)

284

1,103

Total long-term liabilities

284

1,103

Total liabilities

$

6,713

$

18,757

Stockholders' Equity (deficit):

Stock capital: (Note 7)

12

11

Common Stock of $0.00005 par value - Authorized: 100,000,000 shares at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 respectively; Issued and outstanding: 31,567,592 and 23,174,228 shares at September 30,2020 and December31,2019 respectively.

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BrainStorm Announces Financial Results for the Third Quarter of 2020 and Provides a Corporate Update - PRNewswire

How a UCSF team is giving Cronutt the sea lion a second chance with neuroscience – University of California

A cellular therapy for epilepsy developed at UC San Francisco has been employed for the first time in a sea lion with intractable seizures caused by ingesting toxins from algal blooms. The procedure is the first-ever attempt to treat naturally occurring epilepsy in any animal using transplanted cells.

The 7-year-old male sea lion, named Cronutt, first beached in San Luis Obispo County in 2017 and was rescued byThe Marine Mammal Center(TMMC), based in Sausalito, Calif. His epilepsy is due to brain damage caused by exposure to domoic acid released bytoxic algal blooms. Each year, domoic acid poisoning affects hundreds of marine mammals, including both sea lions and sea otters, up and down the West Coast, a problem that is on the rise as climate change warms the worlds oceans, making algal blooms more common.

Like many of these animals, Cronutt cannot survive in the wild due to his epilepsy, and he was transferred by TMMC in 2018 to Six Flags Discovery Kingdom in Vallejo, Calif., which has facilities to care for wildlife with special veterinary needs.

In recent months, Cronutts health has declined due to increasingly frequent and severe seizures. With all other options exhausted, his veterinary team sought help from epilepsy researcherScott C. Baraban, Ph.D., in a last-ditch effort to save the sea lions life. For over a decade, Baraban, who holds the William K. Bowes Endowed Chair in Neuroscience Research in UCSFsDepartment of Neurological Surgery, has been developing the cell-based therapy, which has been shown by his research team to be highly effective in experimental lab animals.

This method is incredibly reliable in mice, but this is the first time it has been tried in a large mammal as a therapy, so well just have to wait and see, said Baraban, a member of the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences. Over the years Ive come to learn how many marine mammals cant be released into the wild due to domoic acid poisoning, and its our hope is that if this procedure is successful it will open the door to helping many more animals.

On Tuesday, Oct. 6, a team of 18 specialists, including veterinarians from Six Flags and neurosurgeons and researchers from UCSF, successfully completed a precisely targeted injection of brain cell precursors taken from pig embryos called neural progenitor cells into Cronutts hippocampus, the brain region responsible for seizures. Based on extensive observations in rodents, Baraban said, the injected embryonic cells should migrate through his damaged hippocampus over the course of days and weeks, integrating and repairing the brain circuitry causing his seizures.

It was a remarkable convergence. Every year there are many animals suffering from epilepsy for which there isnt any treatment available, while, just across the bridge from The Marine Mammal Center, we at UCSF are trying to develop this new form of therapy and looking for ways to one day translate it to the clinic, saidMariana Casalia, Ph.D., a postdoctoral researcher who joined Barabans lab in 2015 to work ontranslating the groups successes in rodentsinto therapies, and who has taken the helm of the sea lion epilepsy project. It seemed very natural for us that these animals could be first patients to hopefully benefit from this therapy.

Domoic acid poisoning in marine mammals causes hippocampal damage very similar to that seen in temporal lobe epilepsy, the most common form of epilepsy in humans. In this disease, damage to hippocampal inhibitory interneurons removes the brakes on electrical activity, leading to seizures. In a vicious cycle, seizures can further damage brain circuitry, which is why epilepsy often worsens over time.

Since 2009, theBaraban labhas been developing a way to replace these damaged interneuronsby transplanting embryonic MGE (medial ganglionic eminence) progenitor cells into the hippocampus. As discovered two decades ago by Barabans UCSF colleaguesArturo lvarez-Buylla, Ph.D., andJohn Rubenstein, Ph.D., MGE cells normallymigrate into hippocampus during brain developmentandintegrate themselves into the local circuitry as inhibitory neurons.

Barabans group has shown that its possible to transplant embryonic MGE cells into the brains of adult rodents with temporal lobe epilepsy, wherethey quickly spread through the hippocampus and repair its damaged circuitry. The procedure reliably reduces seizures in these animals by 90 percent, along with other side effects of epilepsy, such as anxiety and memory problems.

Our laboratorys work has been inspired by the desire to find new solutions for the 30 percent of temporal lobe epilepsy patients who dont respond to available drug treatments, and for whom no new medicines have emerged over the past 50 years. Baraban said. For a number of reasons, including regulatory hurdles, cellular therapies for people with epilepsy are probably still a long way off. However, marine mammals with brain damage from domoic acid poisoning are in a very similar boat with no effective treatments that would let them ever be returned to the wild.

Baraban learned about the hundreds of annual domoic acidrelated strandings of marine mammals from long-time colleague Paul Buckmaster, D.V.M., Ph.D., of Stanford University. Buckmasters seminal studies in collaboration with TMMC in Sausalito had found that these animalssuffer from hippocampal damage almost identical to human temporal lobe epilepsy.

As soon as Mariana and I learned about this issue it was clear that our approach could be a perfect solution to help rehabilitate these animals, Baraban said.

Casalia had spent four years developing and testing a pig source of MGE cells pig tissue is often used for transplants into humans in collaboration with colleagues at UC Davis, work the lab intends to publish soon. On learning about the plight of domoic acidpoisoned sea lions, she partnered with TMMC and the California Academy of Sciences to study sea lion skulls to begin planning an eventual transplant surgery. She ultimately worked with UCSF neurosurgery chairEdward Chang, M.D., and collaborators at the medical software firmBrainLabto create a custom targeting system for the sea lion brain.She had even spent months working closely with the Hamilton Company to create a custom needle for delivering the stem cells to the right spot in a sea lions hippocampus.

All that remained was to find the right patient. And then, in September, 2020, they got a call from a veterinarian at Six Flags asking if they could help save the life of a sea lion named Cronutt.

After rescuing Cronutt in 2017, TMMC had attempted three times to rehabilitate him and release him back into the wild. Each time he would beach himself again, emaciated, disoriented, and approaching humans. Then he began to have seizures. Most marine centers dont have facilities for the long-term care of marine mammals with special needs, but Six Flags volunteered to give Cronutt a new home.

We have cared for a lot of special needs animals over the years, said Dianne Cameron, director of animal care at Six Flags. We adore Cronutt and are committed to providing him a forever home. He has his own apartment in our Sea Lion Stadium with a pool and dry resting area. When hes doing well, he comes out and participates in training sessions. Unfortunately, recently it has been hard to get him to come out of his apartment.

Over this spring and summer, Cronutt had begun a serious decline his seizures were increasing, he was losing weight, and he often seemed disoriented. To oversee Cronutts care, Six Flags hiredClaire Simeone, DVM, a founder and CEO of Sea Change Health, who hadstudied the neurological effects of domoic acid poisoningduring her six years working with TMMC. But it soon became clear that no treatment was working for Cronutt.

Despite our best efforts and all the tools that we have, his seizures were becoming more prolonged and more frequent over time, Simeone said. His brain damage and the effects on his body were getting worse. His decline has been gradual, but we reached a point several months ago where we were questioning what quality of life he had. We had run out of options for how we could successfully manage Cronutts disease and knew that we were going to have to make some hard decisions soon.

Then Simeone recalled a talk Baraban had given at TMMC several years ago about the potential of MGE transplants for marine mammals with domoic acid poisoning. In September, she reached out to ask if the lab might be willing to attempt the procedure as a last-ditch effort to save Cronutts life.

Cronutts health was slipping fast, but Casalias years of preparation for this moment allowed her and her colleagues to quickly assemble everything that would be needed in just one month.

In a bit of serendipity that would prove crucial, Cronutts brain had already been imaged in 2018 by Ben Inglis, Ph.D., of UC BerkeleysHenry H. Wheeler Jr. Brain Imaging Centeras part of an ongoing study ofhow domoic acid poisoning affects the sea lion brain. These MRI images provided critical guideposts that made it possible for UCSF neurosurgeons to plan how they would inject stem cells at just the right spot in Cronutts hippocampus.

Cronutts surgery, conducted in accordance with COVID-19 protocols at the SAGE Veterinary Centers in Redwood City, Calif., went smoothly, and he was returned to Six Flags. In the days after the surgery his veterinary team reported that he had been sleeping and eating well.

Based on prior experiments transplanting pig MGE cells into rats, the researchers expect it to take about a month or so for the cells to fully integrate into Cronutts hippocampus. They will be following up to see if his seizures decrease and his health and behavior improves, and whether his antiseizure medications can be reduced.

This first-ever attempt has been made possible by funding from a Javits Award from the National Institutes of Health and from the UCSFProgram in Breakthrough Biomedical Research. Without these funds, this kind of high-risk, high-reward science would never have gotten off the ground, Baraban added. It also depended on Marianas fearlessness and perseverance in pursuing this very uncertain project.

Casalia, who has degrees in applied science and neurobiology from Universidad National de Quilmes and the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina, says the surgery felt like a culmination of everything shed been working on in her career so far. Ive always wanted to apply what we are doing in the lab to the clinical setting, she said. For me the ability to do this in reality to help these animals who are suffering is a dream come true.

Link:
How a UCSF team is giving Cronutt the sea lion a second chance with neuroscience - University of California

Caliber Pain is Featured as a 2020 Top NYC Patient Rated Pain Management Practice by Find Local Doctors – PR Web

I am truly dedicated to helping my patients decrease pain, improve mobility and increase their overall quality of life. Being recognized by Find Local Doctors as a 2020 Top Patient Rated Doctor is such a huge honor, says Dr. Michael Fakhry

NEW YORK (PRWEB) October 09, 2020

Caliber Pain is New York Citys leading pain management practice, specializing in customized solutions for musculoskeletal pain and mobility issues. These board-certified physicians, led by Dr. Michael Fakhry, employ a multidisciplinary approach combined with the latest non-surgical, evidence-based interventional procedures at their state-of-the-art AAAHC accredited facility in Manhattan. Caliber Pain has gained the attention of Find Local Doctors for the consistent, exceptional reviews they have received from patients. An easy-to-navigate online directory, Find Local Doctors helps consumers connect with local physicians who are highly-qualified and reputable.

Caliber Pain offers interventional treatments and regenerative medicine for a wide variety of injuries and pain issues and are committed to using a multidisciplinary approach to treating patients. They focus on each individual patients needs and goals, from restoring simple mobility issues to the relief of chronic and complex pain conditions. The medical team creates well-rounded treatment plans that include multiple disciplines and procedures, combining injection therapy such as PRP and STEM cell regenerative treatments), ketamine infusions, physical therapy, nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulation and other options to ensure patients have short and long-term pain management. The experienced specialists at Caliber Pain utilize the latest medical technology and work closely with patients, from the initial diagnosis to mapping out an effective treatment program. Many reviews of this practice have mentioned the highly knowledgeable, compassionate staff and the attentive care they received.

I am truly dedicated to helping my patients decrease pain, improve mobility and increase their overall quality of life. Being recognized by Find Local Doctors as a 2020 Top Patient Rated Doctor is such a huge honor, says Dr. Michael Fakhry

More about Dr. Michael Fakhry:

Dr. Michael Fakhry is an interventional pain management specialist who is double board-certified in anesthesiology and pain medicine. Dr. Fakhry graduated from the accelerated BA/MD joint program with Rutgers University and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He then completed his residency in anesthesiology at NYU Medical Center in Manhattan. Following his residency, he completed his fellowship in interventional pain management at NYU where he trained at both academic and public hospitals. Dr. Fakhry is a leader in his field and has published research in numerous medical journals and presented at national and international conferences. Caliber Pain is located at 737 Park Avenue 1C in New York, NY, and can provide a same day diagnosis and interventional pain treatments. Call (212) 203-5987, or visit http://www.caliberpain.com today to schedule your appointment for effective pain management.

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Caliber Pain is Featured as a 2020 Top NYC Patient Rated Pain Management Practice by Find Local Doctors - PR Web

Report of the president: Appointments and promotions | Stanford News – Stanford University News

APPOINTMENTS WITHOUT LIMIT OF TIME:

DeSimone, Joseph, Professor of Radiology and of Chemical Engineering, effective September 1, 2020

Hernandez-Boussard, Tina, Associate Professor of Medicine, and by courtesy, of Surgery, effective November 1, 2020

Rose, Sherri, Associate Professor of Medicine, effective August 1, 2020.

Setsompop, Kawin, Associate Professor of Radiology, effective November 1, 2020

PROMOTIONS WITHOUT LIMIT OF TIME:

Bauer, Andrew, Associate Professor of Anthropology, effective September 1, 2020

Collins, Steven, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective November 1, 2020

Dixon, Scott, Associate Professor of Biology, effective January 1, 2021

Feng, Liang, Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, effective October 1, 2020

Goldbogen, Jeremy, Associate Professor of Biology, effective January 1, 2021

Gweon, Hyowon, Associate Professor of Psychology, effective September 1, 2020

Huh, June, Professor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 2020

Pasa, Sergiu, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, effective August 1, 2020

Rivas-Davila, Juan, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, effective September 1, 2020

Seetah, Krish, Associate Professor of Anthropology, effective August 1, 2020

Simard, Julia, Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, and by courtesy, of Medicine, effective January 1, 2021

Stanford, Douglas, Associate Professor of Physics, effective September 1, 2020

Yan Xia, Associate Professor of Chemistry, effective September 1, 2020

PROMOTION FOR A CONTINUING TERM:

Srivastava, Sakti, Professor (Teaching) of Surgery, effective October 1, 2020

OTHER APPOINTMENTS:

Achour, Sara, Assistant Professor (subject to Ph.D.) of Computer Science, for the period September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2024

Allende Santa Cruz, Claudia, Assistant Professor of Economics in the Graduate School of Business, for the period July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2025

Banik, Steven, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, for the period September 1, 2021 through August 31, 2025

Bouland, Adam, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, for the period September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2024

Chaudhari, Akshay, Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology, for the period October 1, 2020 through September 30, 2024, coterminous with continued salary and research funding from sponsored projects

Clark, Susan, Assistant Professor of Physics, for the period September 1, 2021 through August 31, 2025

Fletcher, Brian, Associate Professor (Teaching) of Law, for the period September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2023

Geldsetzer, Pascal, Assistant Professor of Medicine, for the period November 1, 2020 through October 31, 2024

Kasowski, Maya, Assistant Professor of Medicine and of Pathology, and by courtesy, of Genetics, for the period July 1, 2020 through June 20, 2024

Kozleski, Elizabeth, Professor (Research) of Education, for the period August 31, 2020 through August 30, 2025, coterminous with continued salary and research funding from sponsored projects

Liu, Fang, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, for the period September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2024

Mason, Daniel, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, for the period October 1, 2020 through September 30, 2024

Sharaf, Naima, Assistant Professor of Biology, for the period September 1, 2021 through August 31, 2025

Trivedi, Mudit, Assistant Professor (subject to Ph.D.) of Anthropology, for the period July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2025

OTHER PROMOTIONS:

Blanchet, Jose, Professor of Management Science and Engineering, effective September 1, 2020

Gipper, Brandon, Associate Professor of Accounting in the Graduate School of Business, for the period July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2023

Hbert, Benjamin, Associate Professor of Finance in the Graduate School of Business, for the period August 1, 2020 through July 31, 2023

Heilshorn, Sarah, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering, effective August 1, 2020

Spakowitz, Andrew, Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Materials Science and Engineering, effective September 1, 2020

Yang, Peter, Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, effective October 1, 2020

OTHER REAPPOINTMENTS:

Auclert, Adrien, Assistant Professor of Economics, for the period July 1, 2023 through June 30, 2024

Bacchetta, Rosa, Associate Professor (Research) of Pediatrics, for the period August 1, 2020 through April 30, 2025, coterminous with continued salary and research funding from sponsored projects

Baiocchi, Michael, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and, by courtesy, of Statistics and of Medicine, for the period September 1, 2021 through August, 2022

Battiato, Ilenia, Assistant Professor of Earth System Science, for the period September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2023

Bernert, Rebecca, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, for the period October 1, 2021 through September 30, 2022

Bocolo, Luigi, Assistant Professor of Economics, for the period August 1, 2022 through July 31, 2023

Boettiger, Alistair, Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology, for the period September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2023

Brandman, Onn, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, for the period September 1, 2020 through November 30, 2020

Chan, David, Assistant Professor of Medicine, for the period November 1, 2022 through October 31, 2023

Chaudhuri, Ovijit, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, for the period August 1, 2020 through September 30, 2020

Clement, Julien, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior in the Graduate School of Business, for the period July 17, 2022 through July 16, 2023

Cuesta Rodriguez, Jos, Assistant Professor of Economics, for the period July 1, 2024 through June 30, 2026

Dubra, Alfredo, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, for the period September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2021

Duncan, Laramie, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, for the period September 1, 2022 through August 31, 2023

Dunn, Laura, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, for the period September 1, 2020 through November 30, 2020

Dylan, Dodd, Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology, for the period August 16, 2022 through August 15, 2023

Ellsworth, William, Professor (Research) of Geophysics, for the period October 4, 2020 through October 3, 2025, coterminous with continued salary and research funding from sponsored projects

Feldman, Brian, Assistant Professor of Physics, for the period September 1, 2021 through December 31, 2021

Fetter, Dan, Assistant Professor of Economics, for the period July 1, 2024 through June 30, 2025

Frock, Richard, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology, for the period January 1, 2022 through December 31, 2022

Fung, Lawrence, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, for the period July 1, 2023 through June 30, 2024

Gao, Xiaojing, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, for the period April 1, 2024 through March 31, 2025

Garcia, Antero, Assistant Professor of Education, for the period January 1, 2021 through December 31, 2023

Gorle, Catherine, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, for the period July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2024

Grillet, Nicolas, Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, for the period April 1, 2023 through March 31, 2024

Gross, Eric, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, for the period September 1, 2021 through August 31, 2022

Gu, Xun, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering, for the period June 1, 2022 through May 31, 2023

Heaney, Catherine, Associate Professor (Teaching) of Psychology and of Medicine, for the period July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2025

Hebert, Benjamin, Associate Professor of Finance in the Graduate School of Business, for the period August 1, 2023 through July 31, 2024

Hoffman, Mark, Assistant Professor of Sociology, for the period October 16, 2023 through October 15, 2024

Honigsberg, Colleen, Associate Professor of Law, for the period June 1, 2023 through May 31, 2025

Hu, Yang, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, for the period December 1, 2020 through November 30, 2021

Huang, Possu, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, for the period October 1, 2020 through August 31, 2022

Huang, Ting Ting, Associate Professor (Research) of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, for the period November 1, 2020 through October 31, 2021, coterminous with continued salary and research funding from sponsored projects

Iyer, Usha, Assistant Professor of Art and Art History, for the period June 1, 2023 through May 31, 2024

Jagannathan, Prassana, Assistant Professor of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology, for the period January 1, 2021 through December 31, 2023

Jaiswal, Siddhartha, Assistant Professor of Pathology, for the period November 1, 2021 through October 31, 2022

Kaltschmidt, Julia, Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, for the period April 1, 2021 through March 31, 2022

Kantor, Roanne, Assistant Professor of English, for the period July 1, 2022 through June 30, 2023

Kasowski, Maya, Assistant Professor of Medicine, and by courtesy, of Genetics, for the period July 1, 2024 through June 30, 2025

Keca, Srdan, Assistant Professor of Art and Art History, for the period September 1, 2023 through August 31, 2024

Konermann, Silvana, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, for the period October 1, 2023 through September 30, 2024

Konings, Alexandra, Assistant Professor of Earth System Science, for the period September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2023

Kronengold, Charles, Assistant Professor of Music, for the period January 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022

Kundaje, Anshul, Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Computer Science, for the period December 1, 2020 through November 30. 2022

Kwon, Marci, Assistant Professor of Art and Art History, for the period August 1, 2023 through July 31, 2024

Larson, Bradley, Assistant Professor of Economics, for the period August 1, 2023 through July 30, 2024

Linderman, Scott, Assistant Professor of Statistics, for the period June 1, 2023 through May 31, 2025

Long, Jonathan, Assistant Professor of Pathology, for the period January 1, 2023 through December 1, 2023

Mai, Danielle, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, for the period January 1, 2024 through December 31, 2024

Mannix, Andrew, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, for the period August 1, 2024 through July 31, 2025

Martinez-Martin, Nicole, Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics, for the period December 1, 2023 through November 30, 2024, coterminous with continued salary and research funding from sponsored projects

Morten, Melanie, Assistant Professor of Economics, for the period July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022

Mross, Michaela, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, for the period September 1, 2023 through August 31, 2024

Newman, Aaron, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science, for the period August 1, 2021 through July 31, 2022

Palacios, Julia, Assistant Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science, for the period September 1, 2021 through August 31, 2024

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Report of the president: Appointments and promotions | Stanford News - Stanford University News

UTSW Scientist: ‘We Need More Women Thinking Creatively in the Lab and Pushing Science Forward’ – dallasinnovates.com

[Image: Oleksandr Bushko/istockphoto]

Its rare to have a woman winning a Nobel Prize, much less two women on the same day and three in the same year, a UTSW spokesperson told us as the news rolled out about this years winners.

American biochemist Jennifer Doudna and French Emmanuelle Charpentier became the first women to jointly win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Tuesday. They are the sixth and seventh women to ever win that prize. American astrophysicist Andrea Ghez, along with two others, won the Nobel Prize in physics for their discoveries about black holes on Monday.

UTSW scientist Eric Olson spent the day on a Zoom call with Nobel Prize winner Doudna earlier this week. Olson, who uses CRISPR technology in studies that might one day repair many of the mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy, called the prize great news.

Doudna and her colleague Charpentier have revolutionized science, biotechnology, and medicine with the development of CRISPR as a gene-editing tool, says Olson, who is the director of UTSWs Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine and professor and chair of molecular biology.

UT Southwesterns Dr. Eric Olson works with longtime collaborator Dr. Jay Schneider, an adjunct associate professor of internal medicine-cardiology. [Photo: UTSW]

CRISPR forms the basis of a primitive bacterial immune system, which they cleverly adapted to modify the genomes of any organism in a simple and efficient manner, Olson explains.

There are many ways CRISPR gene editing can benefit humanity, he says. The technology is already enabling the elimination of genetic mutations that cause devastating human diseases, Olson says. The breakthrough discovery of Doudna and Charpentier exemplifies the power of basic science to change the world in powerful ways.

The UTSW professor also co-founded Exonics Therapeutics, a Massachusetts-based biotech company that uses CRISPR technology licensed from UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, that acquired in 2019 by Vertex Pharmaceuticals in a deal roughly valued at $1 billion. The scientist launched Exonics in February 2017 to advance and commercialize his research. The company develops treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other genetic neuromuscular diseases.

Olson works with Professor Rhonda Bassel-Duby, Ph.D., a highly cited researcher who helps run the Olson laboratory.

UT Southwestern Professor Rhonda Bassel-Duby [Photo: UTSW]

Bassel-Duby says its wonderful that the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to two woman who richly deserve the prize. She hopes the award encourages young women to consider a career in science: Doing scientific research is one of the most enriching and fulfilling professions. We need more women thinking creatively in the lab and pushing science forward, Bassel-Duby says.

Olson and Bassel-Duby work alongside longtime collaborator Jay Schneider, an M.D. and Ph.D. who is an adjunct associate professor of internal medicine-cardiology.

Olson holds the Annie and Willie Nelson Professorship in Stem Cell Research, the Pogue Distinguished Chair in Research on Cardiac Birth Defects, and The Robert A. Welch Distinguished Chair in Science.

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Take a look back on the stories that grabbed our readers' attention last month.

FusionFlight, which received a $50,000 seed investment in 2016, has built and tested "the world's smallest and most powerful jet-powered drone with vertical take-off and landing capabilities."

There are plenty of things to do withyourphysically distanced time. Here are a few from our curated selection.

Taysha Gene Therapies, which has been operating in stealth with UT Southwestern, is off to a fast start with a pipeline of 15 gene therapy programs. Together with UTSW, the combined platform could be"an engine for new cures."

Taysha Gene Therapies, which was been operating in stealth with UT Southwestern until this April, plans to use the financing to advance its initial cohort of lead programs into its clinic. By the end of 2021, Taysha expects to file four Investigational New Drug applications.

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UTSW Scientist: 'We Need More Women Thinking Creatively in the Lab and Pushing Science Forward' - dallasinnovates.com

Here’s what is known about Trump’s COVID-19 treatment – Science Magazine

President Donald Trump has maintained a steady schedule of campaign rallies, which may have exposed him to SARS-CoV-2.

By Jon CohenOct. 2, 2020 , 9:25 PM

Sciences COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

This afternoon, the White House announced that President Donald Trump received an experimental antibody treatment after a test revealed he'sinfected with SARS-CoV-2. He reportedly has mild COVID-19 symptoms, including fever and congestion, and he was transferred to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Later, the president's medical team confirmed he had started a course of remdesivir, an antiviral drug shown to modestly help hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

What is the antibody cocktail Trump received?

Its a combination of two antibodies directed against a key protein of the virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2. They bind to a region on the main surface spike protein that helps the virus attach to a receptor on human cells called angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The targeted region is dubbed the receptor binding domain. One antibody comes from a human who had recovered from a SARS-CoV-2 infection; a B cell that makes the antibody was harvested from the persons blood and the genes for the immune protein isolated and copied. The other antibody is from a mouse, which was engineered to have a human immune system, that had the spike protein injected into it.

Are there any data showing that the cocktail works and is safe?

Experiments in both golden hamsters and rhesus macaque monkeys that intentionally were infected with SARS-CoV-2 showed that the cocktail could reduce viral levels and disease pathology.

Regeneron, the maker of the cocktail, earlier this week presented preliminary data from its ongoing clinical trial in people who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 but were asymptomatic or, in the most extreme cases, had moderate diseasea group that would appear to mirror Trumps current condition. No serious safety concerns surfaced, and the treatment reduced viral load and shortened symptomatic disease in patients who did not have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies at the trials start. Its unclear whether the treatment can prevent severe disease, but there were hints that it might: Participants who received a placebo had more medical visits.

A separate trial is assessing the impact of the treatment on hospitalized COVID-19 patients, but Regeneron has yet to report any results from that study.

Do the preliminary clinical trial data match the presidents treatment scheme?

Not exactly. Trump received an 8-gram infusion of the treatment. Regenerons data showed that a 2.4-gram infusion worked as well as the higher dose at reducing SARS-CoV-2 levels in people. This was widely seen as good news because monoclonals are difficult and expensive to produce, and a lower dose means that more people ultimately can receive it.

Why did the president receive the higher dose of the antibodies?

Likely out of an abundance of caution by the presidents medical team, says George Yancopoulos, the co-founder and chief scientific officer of Regeneron. Yancopoulos does not directly know why Trump'sphysicians chose to use 8 grams, but says the companys data indicate theres very, very limited risk that the antibodies will cause harm at either dose. The higher dose might last longer, he said, and at some time points in the companys study, Regeneron did see trends suggesting that the higher dose more powerfully beats back the virusthe company used the amount of viral genetic material found with nose swabs as a proxy for SARS-CoV-2 levels in the entire body.

If I had to treat one patient, Id give the high dose, Yancopoulos says. From a societal point of view and the need to treat as many people as possible, Id give the lower dose.

Did Trump match the patients in the study who benefited from the treatment?

The Regeneron study found that the treatment only worked in people who did not have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies at the start of the study. It also worked best in people who had higher levels of the virus. Whether the president had those antibodies and a high viral load has not been made public. I couldnt speculate because it has to do with an individual patient, Yancopoulos says.

The memorandum from the presidents physician said Trump was receivingRegenerons polyclonal antibody cocktail. Are these antibodies polyclonal?

No. The treatment consisted of two monoclonal antibodiesmeaning each was produced by making identical copies, or clones, of an antibody gene in a single B cell. Polyclonal antibody cocktails refer to antibodies made by mixtures of B cells.

What was the regulatory mechanism that allowed the president to receive the experimental Regeneron antibodies?

The antibodies are typically only available to people who participate in clinical trials. Trump theoretically could have enrolled in the ongoing treatment study that reported preliminary data this week, but that trial randomly assigns half the participants to receive the antibodies; the other half serves as a control group and receives infusions of an inactive placebo. A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation called expanded accesstechnically known as 21 CFR 312.310allows physicians to request compassionate use of experimental treatments through an investigational new drug pathway used for individual patients or for emergencies. These are designed to be used in these rare and special circumstances, Yancopoulos says. This is not the first time weve done compassionate use for these monoclonal antibodies. This is not a mechanism for widespread distribution.

Could Regenerons monoclonal antibody treatment become more widely available through the FDAs emergency use authorization (EUA) pathway?

Yes. Both Regeneron and Eli Lilly, which similarly reported encouraging preliminary clinical trial data last month from a single SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibody, are discussing the possibility of an EUA with FDA. Lilly reported signs that its antibody reduced the need for hospitalization, but as with Regeneron, too few participants have so far become seriously ill to reach a convincing conclusion to this critical question.

What's the evidence for using remdesivir in COVID-19 patients?

Remdesivir is an antiviral drug developed by Gilead Sciences, originally to treat the hepatitis C virus. It did not perform well against that pathogen but has been tried against Ebola and other viruses, after showing some activity in cells and animal models. The drug inhibits a viral enzyme used for replication of the pathogen. Earlier this year, it demonstrated a modest clinical benefit in a trial with hospitalized COVID-19 patients, leading FDA to grant Gilead an emergency use authorization for the drug. That EUA has since been expanded for use in patients with mild disease although its benefit in them is not clear. The drug has become widely used for COVID-19 patients despite continuing skepticism that it has a major clinical benefit. Since it and the monoclonal antibodies target different parts of the virus, administering them together may have a synergistic effect. One COVID-19 clinical trial is testing remdesivir and Lilly's antibody, for example.

Is the president receiving any other COVID-19 treatments?

The statement released today by the presidents physician said that in addition to the antibodies, Trump has been taking zinc, vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin. That wording leaves unclear whether he was taking those substances before his diagnosed infection. Notably, the statement does not indicate whetherTrump was or is taking hydroxychloroquine, the antimalarial he controversially pushed as a COVID-19 treatment.

Famotidine has been suggested to be a treatment for COVID-19, but its also a popular heartburn remedy, sold widely under the name Pepcid. A clinical trial testing it in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in New York was not able to recruit enough patients to properly evaluate its impact. The Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, which initiated that trial, released a statement today citing evidence it was helpful for COVID-19 but also saying, We have yet to prove [famotidines] efficacy. The institute says its eagerly awaiting FDA approval of a trial that will evaluate whether famotidine can help people who are not hospitalized.

*Updated, 3 October, 6 a.m.: Information about Trumps's use of remdesivir was added to the story.

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Here's what is known about Trump's COVID-19 treatment - Science Magazine

Election Guide: Here’s What You Need to Know About Proposition 14 – NBC Bay Area

Proposition 14 on the November ballot asks voters to approve $5.5 billion to continue funding stem cell research in California.

Supporters said the research has already lead to important medical breakthroughs, including for COVID-19 victims. Opponents said the proposition is more "shameless overpromising" with money that could be better spent elsewhere.

California voters have been though this before.

In 2004, state voters approved Proposition 71, which meant $3 billion for stem cell research and to establish the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, or CIRM. The group's chairman and Proposition 14's financial backer, Robert Klein, said that money has lead to significant medical breakthroughs.

But now, CIRM is almost out of money, and Proposition 14 asks voters for $5.5 more for stem cell research.

"If 70 different patient advocacy organizations, from the Michael J. Fox Foundation to the American Diabetes Foundation and the American Association of Cancer Researchers all endorse us -- could they all be wrong?" Klein asked.

Longtime AIDS activist Jeff Sheehy is on the CIRM board and said residents are still paying $325 million a year for Proposition 71.

"We're going to add another $300 million on top of that -- that's two-thirds of $1 billion for stem cell research," Sheehy said. "We don't have a single FDA approved product yet."

Sheehy said taxpayer funding of stem cell research was needed back in 2004 when California was on its own, but now the feds and private industry are spending billions on it every year.

"So we're just duplicating," Sheehy said.

Marcy Darnovsky, executive director of the Center for Genetics and Society, opposes Proposition 14 because of CIRM's quote "Shameless overpromising and hype set the stage for hundreds of underregulated commercial stem cell clinics now offering unapproved treatments that have caused tumors and blindness."

"All those people who survive COVID-19, they are finding up to 50% have heart damage and other organ damage," Darnovsky said. "How are you going to regenerate those tissues? Regenerative medicine is still cell therapy."

Dr. Michael Matthay professor of critical care medicine at UCSF, said CIRM has provided grant money to help research COVID-19 treatments.

"We are using cell based therapy to reduce injury to longs from COVID-19 and to accelerate the recovery process," Matthay said.

It should be pointed out everyone interviewed for this story are in favor of stem cell research -- Darnovsky and Sheehy believe that the billions of dollars being asked of taxpayers could be better spent on education, healthcare, housing and jobs.

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Election Guide: Here's What You Need to Know About Proposition 14 - NBC Bay Area

ASX up 2.3%, banks and energy outperform – The Sydney Morning Herald

ASX-listed biopharma Opthea Limited has named Ovid Therapeutics founder and chief executive Dr Jeremy Levin as its new chairman.

Dr Levin, who concurrently chairs the Biotechnology Innovation Organisation, the largest trade organisation in the world that represents the biotechnology industry, will replace outgoing chair Geoffrey Kempler at the firms annual general meeting on October 13.

Opthea said Dr Levins track record and experience in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry will be instrumental as the company advances its Phase 3-ready product candidate, OPT-302, for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema conditions.

Prior to founding Ovid, the South African-born Dr Levin was president and chief executive of Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd and before Teva, was a member of the executive committee of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company.

He has served on the board of directors of various public and private biopharmaceutical companies, including Biocon Ltd and is currently on the board of directors of Lundbeck.

Shares in Opthea were 0.7 per cent lower at $2.81 at 11am against a 2 per cent rise for the ASX200. The companys share price has dipped 5.7 per cent in 2020. The wider index has fallen 11.5 per cent.

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ASX up 2.3%, banks and energy outperform - The Sydney Morning Herald