Scientists create an 'eye-in-a-dish' using human stem cells

Scientists copied processes that occur in the womb to create eye tissue Study used adult stem cells that have been genetically reprogrammed Lab-grown tissue responded to light the same way as it does in the eye The study represents a first step towards restoring sight in the blind

By Ellie Zolfagharifard

Published: 12:14 EST, 10 June 2014 | Updated: 14:02 EST, 10 June 2014

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A light-sensitive 'eye-in-a-dish' has been created by scientists using a type of human stem cell.

The three dimensional structure represents a first step towards restoring sight to the blind, say the researchers.

Processes that occur in the womb were copied to create complex retinal tissue in a laboratory petri dish.

A light-sensitive 'eye-in-a-dish' has been created by scientists in Maryland. The three dimensional structure represents a first step towards restoring sight to the blind, say the researchers. Pictured are the photoreceptors (in green) within a 'mini retina' structure (blue) that was created using human stem cells

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Scientists create an 'eye-in-a-dish' using human stem cells

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