Stem cell mobilization therapy may effectively treat osteoarthritis

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

19-Jun-2014

Contact: Robert Miranda cogcomm@aol.com Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

Putnam Valley, NY. (June 19, 2014) Researchers in Taiwan have found that peripheral blood stem cells "mobilized" by a special preparation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prior to their injection into rats modeling osteoarthritis (OA), stimulated the bone marrow to produce stem cells, leading to the inhibition of OA progression. The finding, they said, may lead to a more effective therapy for OA, a common joint disease that affects 10 percent of Americans over the age of 60.

The study will be published in a future issue of Cell Transplantation and is currently freely available on-line as an unedited early e-pub at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/pre-prints/content-ct1109Deng.

"Currently, OA treatment involves the use of anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, lubricating supplements, or surgery," said study lead author Dr. Shih-Chieh Hung of the Department of Medical Research and Education at the Taipei Veterans general Hospital in Taiwan. "Recently, hematopoietic (blood) stem cells derived from bone marrow have emerged as a potential treatment for OA. We hypothesized that G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (gm-PBSCs) contain a population of primitive stem cells that have the capacity for mobility once released from stem cell niches."

While the beneficial effects of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells have been documented when used for treating the negative effects of chemotherapy and radiation, as well as peripheral arterial diseases, this is the first study to investigate the use of gm-PBSCs to treat skeletal diseases, such as OA.

"We demonstrated that PBSCs, mobilized by G-CSF and infused for five days in rats modelling OA, provided a number of beneficial results, including increasing cluster of differentiation 34 positive (CD34+) cell percentages up to 55 fold," reported the authors. "Further, we demonstrated that the progression of OA was inhibited by the gm-PBSCs."

The researchers noted that the use of G-CSF administration in humans to treat other diseases and conditions has been found to be "safe and effective," despite known side effects such as bone pain, headache, fatigue, and nausea which, they added, are generally "transient, self-limiting and without long-term consequences."

"Although potential long-term adverse effects, such as malignancy after G-CSF administration have been reported, the frequency is low and the relationship between major adverse effects and G-CSF administration is not clear," said Dr. Hung.

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Stem cell mobilization therapy may effectively treat osteoarthritis

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