Stem-cell advocacy ‘moved the needle’

A beautiful, fresh face, Sabrina Cohen can stun you with her charm.

But she is far more. This 24-year-old, who has spent 10 years in a wheelchair as a result of a car accident, is battling to raise money for research and therapies that may eventually reverse paralysis and treat central nervous system impairments.

A native of Miami Beach, she is one of five leaders being honored by the Palm Beach-based Genetic Policy Institute at its eighth annual World Stem Cell Summit Dec. 4 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach. She is receiving the Inspirational Award.

This award brings a lot of meaning to my life and the path I have chosen to follow, she says of her founding of the nonprofit Sabrina Cohen Foundation.

This provides a platform for my foundation to inspire others and to share my hope for (stem cell) regeneration.

Other honorees include CBS 60 Minutes for its hard-hitting programs on unproven stem cell treatments; Susan Solomon, CEO of the New York Stem Cell Foundation; Alliance for Regenerative Medicine; and the Nebraska Coalition for Lifesaving Cures.

We recognize the dedicated individuals and organizations that positively impact the cause of stem-cell advancement aimed at finding cures and alleviating human suffering, said Bernard Siegel, executive director of GPI.

Through their positive actions, our honorees have moved the regenerative medicine needle, bringing closer the day when patients will be safely treated through these innovative technologies.

Previous Stem Cell Action awardees have included Maryland Governor Martin OMalley, Research!America, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Michael J. Fox, Robert Klein, Sherry Lansing, Palm Beacher A. Alfred Taubman and the National Association of Biology Teachers.

This year, panels will address advancing treatments for specific diseases and conditions including cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular disease, spinal cord injury, paralysis, multiple sclerosis, ALS, Parkinsons, eye diseases and others.

The rest is here:
Stem-cell advocacy ‘moved the needle’

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