Hammond police officer jumps at chance to donate stem cells – The Times of Northwest Indiana

The grandmother of a local boy fighting cancer explained a swab would be taken from their mouths and sent off for analysis. If they were determined to be a match for someone in need, they would be notified.

Its hard to get a match, Seles said. But if you do, they ask, 'Would you be interested in following through?'"

Seles and his wife both signed up, but so far Courtney Seles hasnt received a call.

Adam learned in summer 2019 that he was a match and the recipient would need a donation within just four to six weeks.

He traveled with his father, Nathan Seles, 58, to Grand Rapids for a physical and blood draw. While they were at the facility, staff worked to ensure Seles was comfortable and wanted to follow through with the donation process.

At one point, he looked over and saw his father was crying, he said.

It means a lot to him, Seles said of his dad. Hes dealt with cancer a few times. It means a lot to him that I can do something.

Seles began the injections at home with the help of his mother-in-law, a nurse, he said.

Medical staff warned he could feel pain in the back or legs, because the medication being injected allows stem cells to pass from the bone marrow into the blood stream.

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Hammond police officer jumps at chance to donate stem cells - The Times of Northwest Indiana

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