Ottawa mans stem-cell transplant set-back

Ottawa-native, Chris Taylor, is riding an emotional roller coaster.

Taylor was first diagnosed with Leukemia 2 years ago. Chemotherapy worked but the cancer soon returned. Without a stem-cell transplant, doctors fear his cancer will keep coming back.

Taylor is a business partner at the Crazy Horse Grill in Kanata, and he manages Grace O'Malley's pub in Toronto. In October, his friends and colleagues held swabbing parties, hoping to find him a stem-cell match.

In Canada, the OneMatch registry is looking for male donors aged 17 to 35. For those who do match someone in need, the procedure isn't painful; in most cases it's similar to donating blood.

In November, Taylor was told his match had been found. Days before the transplant, the donor suffered a medical complication that made him unable to donate.

Taylor was put back on the list, and a second donor was found. A new transplant date was set for early April. Suddenly, that donor has backed-out. The circumstances surrounding that decision remain confidential.

"There are a lot of reasons why somebody could (back-out), so I can't judge, says Taylor, Who am I to judge anyway. I have to stay positive for my own fight.

Right now Taylor's cancer is in remission, he only hopes to find another match before it returns.

If the cancer comes back we are in trouble, explains Taylor. We can't do the transplant that's the problem. The patient has to be in remission, that's why the clock is ticking.

CTVs Natalie Pierosara will have more on this story tonight at six.

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Ottawa mans stem-cell transplant set-back

Stem cell research gets $500,000 boost

UC Merced professor Kara McCloskey was recently awarded a highly competitive $500,000 grant to continue research in human stem cell biology, as part of an effort to enhance stem cell research in California.

In February, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine approved more than $27million for Basic Biology V Awards, and McCloskeys grant is included. The leads for this effort include Stanford University and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

In her laboratory, McCloskey and her students are using stem cells to engineer cardiovascular tissues that could someday be used to repair damaged blood vessels or heart tissue.

Specifically, they are producing highly specialized cells that have not been the focus of much research to date the endothelial cells found at the tips and in the stalks, including phalanx endothelial cells, of blood vessels and cells that could help repair a damaged heart.

The phalanx cells exhibit anti-inflammatory properties, and the ones in the tips and stalks contribute to angiogenesis, the new growth of blood vessels, said McCloskey, who teachers in the School of Engineering.

The two-year grant will help support her laboratory, including five undergrads, five graduate students and one post-doctoral scholar as they gather the data that takes them to the next step building 3-D models of the vessels through which fluid can flow.

Before implantation, we will first build and test the functional blood vessels to make sure they work properly, she said.

Stem cell research has made huge strides since California made the research part of its constitutional right with the passage of Proposition 71 in 2004. But there are still issues with getting the human body to accept the new cells, even once the specialized cells are physically available to repair damaged and-or diseased cells and tissue.

Aluma credits new work to UC academic approach

Graduate school is a constant state of discovery, something UC Merced alumna Jackie Shay credits for her current passion: fungus.

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Stem cell research gets $500,000 boost

Stem Cell Therapy | Animal Medical Center

The unique ability of stem cells to mature into cells with specialized functions makes them useful for repairing certain body tissues damaged by injury or disease. The Animal Medical Center is now harnessing the power of these cells by offering stem cell therapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis. The AMC is offering this service through a partnership with Vet-Stem, Inc., an innovator in veterinary regenerative cell medicine.

Stem cell therapy uses an animals own primitive (stem) cells which are capable of dividing and differentiating into a variety of cell types (such as cartilage, bone, or muscle). In areas of injury or disease, stem cells respond to signaling to allow healing and promote regeneration of injured tissues. The most common clinical application for stem cell therapy is currently chronic arthritis.

The process involves three key steps over a three-day period:

Vet-Stem, Inc. is also developing protocols to use stem cell technology as therapy for other conditions in the near future, such as cerebral and myocardial infarction and immune-mediated, renal, neurologic, and hepatic diseases.

Stem cell therapy at The AMC is being directed by Dr. Pamela Schwartz. A Staff Surgeon at The Animal Medical Center, Dr. Schwartz received her board certification in 2008. She has an interest in stem cell therapy and became credentialed in Vet-Stem Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy in October 2007.

The AMC has used stem cell therapy to treat several dogs with pain associated with chronic osteoarthritis. The best results have been noted in dogs that had been experiencing a high level of pain that could not be relieved with medication.

To find out if your dog is a candidate for stem cell therapy, contact the appointment desk at 212-838-7053 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Schwartz.

Read an article from the New York Post on stem cell therapy.

Read a behind the scenes account of stem cell surgery at The AMC.

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Stem Cell Therapy | Animal Medical Center

DINUKTOR | 5 stem cell society doctors face raps for submitting falsified PRC endorsement to SEC

By: Jet Villa, InterAksyon.com March 17, 2014 7:45 AM

FILE PHOTO

InterAksyon.com The online news portal of TV5

MANILA - Five doctor-incorporators of the Philippine Society for Stem Cell Medicine (PSSCM) face charges and may have their medical licenses revoked for submitting a fabricated endorsement from the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Among them are chairman of the Philippine Medical Association Leo Olarte, PSSCM treasurer and legal counsel; Bu Castro, secretary; Rey Melchor Santos, president; Oscar Tinio, vice president; and Jose Asa Sabili, chairman.

In a statement, PRC Chairperson Teresita Manzala on Sunday said she directed the Professional Regulatory Board of Medicine (PRBOM) to initiate, investigate, and file charges against the five doctors before the PRCs legal division for unprofessional, dishonorable, and unethical conduct.

Earlier on 10 January 2014, the SEC cancelled the registration of the PSSCM for submitting a fabricated document. In an order signed by SEC Acting Director Ferdinand Sales, the commission said the PSSCM had committed fraud in procuring its Certificate of Incorporation for its application for corporate registration.

Wherefore, premises considered, the Certificate of Registration of Philippine Society for Stem Cell Medicine with SEC Registration No. CN201303986, approved on March 6, 2013 is hereby revoked, the order reads.

Falsified endorsement

SEC said PSSCM submitted a 2ndPRC Indorsement, dated 20 February 2013, supposedly from Manzala. But on14 August 2014, SEC received a letter-complaint from Manzala informing the commission that the signature appearing in the alleged favorable indorsement from PRC was not hers and, thus, falsified.

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DINUKTOR | 5 stem cell society doctors face raps for submitting falsified PRC endorsement to SEC

DINUKTOR | 5 stem cell society doctors face raps for submitting falsified document to SEC

By: Jet Villa, InterAksyon.com March 17, 2014 7:45 AM

FILE PHOTO

InterAksyon.com The online news portal of TV5

MANILA - Five doctor-incorporators of the Philippine Society for Stem Cell Medicine (PSSCM) face charges and may have their medical licenses revoked for submitting a fabricated endorsement from the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Among them are chairman of the Philippine Medical Association Leo Olarte, PSSCM treasurer and legal counsel; Bu Castro, secretary; Rey Melchor Santos, president; Oscar Tinio, vice president; and Jose Asa Sabili, chairman.

In a statement, PRC Chairperson Teresita Manzala on Sunday said she directed the Professional Regulatory Board of Medicine (PRBOM) to initiate, investigate, and file charges against the five doctors before the PRCs legal division for unprofessional, dishonorable, and unethical conduct.

Earlier on 10 January 2014, the SEC cancelled the registration of the PSSCM for submitting a fabricated document. In an order signed by SEC Acting Director Ferdinand Sales, the commission said the PSSCM had committed fraud in procuring its Certificate of Incorporation for its application for corporate registration.

Wherefore, premises considered, the Certificate of Registration of Philippine Society for Stem Cell Medicine with SEC Registration No. CN201303986, approved on March 6, 2013 is hereby revoked, the order reads.

Falsified endorsement

SEC said PSSCM submitted a 2ndPRC Indorsement, dated 20 February 2013, supposedly from Manzala. But on14 August 2014, SEC received a letter-complaint from Manzala informing the commission that the signature appearing in the alleged favorable indorsement from PRC was not hers and, thus, falsified.

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DINUKTOR | 5 stem cell society doctors face raps for submitting falsified document to SEC

Stem cells from muscle can repair nerve damage after injury, Pitt researchers show

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

18-Mar-2014

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran 412-578-9193 University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

PITTSBURGH, March 18, 2014 Stem cells derived from human muscle tissue were able to repair nerve damage and restore function in an animal model of sciatic nerve injury, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, published online today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, suggest that cell therapy of certain nerve diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, might one day be feasible.

To date, treatments for damage to peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, have not been very successful, often leaving patients with impaired muscle control and sensation, pain and decreased function, said senior author Johnny Huard, Ph.D., professor of orthopaedic surgery, and Henry J. Mankin Chair in Orthopaedic Surgery Research, Pitt School of Medicine, and deputy director for cellular therapy, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

"This study indicates that placing adult, human muscle-derived stem cells at the site of peripheral nerve injury can help heal the lesion," Dr. Huard said. "The stem cells were able to make non-neuronal support cells to promote regeneration of the damaged nerve fiber."

The researchers, led by Dr. Huard and Mitra Lavasani, Ph.D., first author and assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery, Pitt School of Medicine, cultured human muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells in a growth medium suitable for nerve cells. They found that, with prompting from specific nerve-growth factors, the stem cells could differentiate into neurons and glial support cells, including Schwann cells that form the myelin sheath around the axons of neurons to improve conduction of nerve impulses.

In mouse studies, the researchers injected human muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells into a quarter-inch defect they surgically created in the right sciatic nerve, which controls right leg movement. Six weeks later, the nerve had fully regenerated in stem-cell treated mice, while the untreated group had limited nerve regrowth and functionality. Twelve weeks later, treated mice were able to keep their treated and untreated legs balanced at the same level while being held vertically by their tails. When the treated mice ran through a special maze, analyses of their paw prints showed eventual restoration of gait. Treated and untreated mice experienced muscle atrophy, or loss, after nerve injury, but only the stem cell-treated animals had regained normal muscle mass by 72 weeks post-surgery.

"Even 12 weeks after the injury, the regenerated sciatic nerve looked and behaved like a normal nerve," Dr. Lavasani said. "This approach has great potential for not only acute nerve injury, but also conditions of chronic damage, such as diabetic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis."

Drs. Huard and Lavasani and the team are now trying to understand how the human muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells triggered injury repair, as well as developing delivery systems, such as gels, that could hold the cells in place at larger injury sites.

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Stem cells from muscle can repair nerve damage after injury, Pitt researchers show

Stem cell politics behind forgery chargesPMA president

Leo Olarte, M.D., PMA president. PHOTO from http://www.philippinemedicalassociation.org

MANILA, Philippines Politics over stem cell treatment may be behind the move to slap an ethics case against him for allegedly falsifying signatures, the Philippine Medical Association (PMA) president said.

In an interview over Inquirer Radio 990 AM on Monday, Dr. Leo Olarte said he found it suspicious that Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) Chair Teresita Manzala announced the ethics case against him on the day of the elections for the next PMA president.

He claimed Manzala slapped the ethics case before the PRC to ruin his chances of being re-elected in the countrys largest doctors association.

Olarte said Manzala has connections to doctors who are against stem cell medicine. Olarte is a supporter of stem cell treatment.

Manzala released the statement on the day of our elections specifically to destroy my name Manzala (also) has connections to doctors who are against stem cell. I am pro-stem cell treatment while my rival (for president) is not, Olarte said in Filipino.

In a Philippine Daily Inquirer report on Sunday, Olarte and his four predecessors were charged with fraud in the registration of the Philippine Society for Stem Cell Medicine (PSSCM) in the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Olarte and the four others Bu Castro, Rey Melchor Santos, Oscar Tinio and Jose Sabili were accused of forging Manzalas signature in an endorsement for the incorporation of the PSSCM.

But Olarte blamed a syndicate behind the alleged forgery.

He said the PMA paid a private trading company to process the PSSCMs incorporation with the SEC. The doctor did not name the company.

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Stem cell politics behind forgery chargesPMA president