Category Archives: Stem Cell Medical Center

AMC to use stem cell therapy in treating graft-versus-host disease – Korea Biomedical Review

Korean researchers have found a signal transduction system that modulates the treatment of mesenchymal stem cells and immune control functions, opening the way for treating graft-versus-host disease treatment.

Mesenchymal stem cells divide into various cells, have immunomodulatory functions, and are the primary cell sources for stem cell therapy.

Graft-versus-host disease is a fatal disease that leads to death after an allogeneic blood transfusion or bone marrow transplantation. Although there are many clinical trials underway worldwide to treat the symptom, there are no applicable treatments besides alleviating symptoms with high-dose steroids.

The team, led by Professor Shin Dong-myeong of the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Asan Medical Center, discovered that the CREB1 (CAMP responsive element binding protein 1) signaling system activates the treatment and immune control functions of mesenchymal stem cells.

The team administered a therapeutic agent made by upgrading mesenchymal stem cells to graft-versus-host disease mice, and found that it alleviated anorexia symptoms and reduced the weight loss rate by 30 percent while increasing the survival rate by 30 percent.

When developing a cell therapy product, researchers have to cultivate the stem cells in vitro. Thus it is very likely that it will impair stem cell functions due to free radicals generated in the cells. To prevent the deterioration of stem cell function, it is necessary to improve the stem cell function in vitro culture, prevent stem cell oxidation, and increase the antioxidant capacity of the cell itself.

Until now, there was a lack of specific evidence and understanding of how stem cells regulate glutathione, an indicator of antioxidant capacity. Therefore, it was difficult to prevent stem cell dysfunction and oxidation.

Professor Shin's team developed experimental techniques that can monitor and quantify glutathione in real-time and confirmed that the CREB1 signaling system regulated the amount and activity of glutathione.

By activating the CREB1 signaling system, the team found that the process also activated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) protein, which maintains the antioxidant capacity of mesenchymal stem cells and the increase of both the expression levels of peroxiredoxin-1 (PRDX1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM) protein, which synthesize glutathione and are antioxidant activity indicators.

As a result, the team confirmed that its method was effective in treating the graft-versus-host disease.

"Based on this study, we have secured a technological foundation to advance stem cell treatment by controlling the antioxidant capacity of stem cells," Professor Shin said.

If this technology makes a high-purity and high-quality stem cell treatment, the team expects that it will be a step toward developing a graft-versus-host disease treatment and overcoming various intractable diseases such as nervous system diseases and inflammatory diseases with high medical demand, Shin added.

The results of the study were published in the journal, Science Advances.

corea022@docdocdoc.co.kr

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AMC to use stem cell therapy in treating graft-versus-host disease - Korea Biomedical Review

Drumming class finds a new rhythm with creative connections – Yes! Weekly

Winston-Salem, N.C. When music professor John Becks Afro-Cuban drumming class moved online, his students didnt miss a beat even though only one of the 17 seniors in his class had access to a drum.

The global drum circle community on social media was quick to offer ideas for virtual groups. One video showed a friend of mine drumming on a picnic table and asking people to play his rhythm back, said Beck.

The students first assignment was based on that video.

I assembled their clips together and posted the recording so they could all see each other like we do in class when we are seated in a circle. One week I asked the students to send me their favorite song, and they recorded themselves drumming on buckets, tables, boxes and metal pots.

In an in-person class there is a sense of community, Beck explains. The group works together creating rhythm, smiling and enjoying the experience. But after spending time immersed in the video projects, looking at the student clips, watching them drum and assembling the projects on his computer, he felt he knew this class better than any other he has taught.

Beck recently completed a 22-month study at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center with stem cell transplant recipients using a protocol developed called Comfort Sound drumming. During the patient drumming experience, researchers identified improvement in mood, energy and relaxation, and decreases in anxiety, distress and pain.

The video compilations were a way of being together through the music and my students expressed they felt similar benefits to the ones in our study. Our work together helped them cope with the stress of finishing their time at Wake Forest away from their friends and teachers.

Senior Lizzie Pittinger, a political science major, said continuing with the drumming exercises online was not only a fun way to stay connected with her classmates, but also created a sense of normalcy during this uncertain time. Despite the physical distance that I felt from my classmates as we were all learning from our own homes, the weekly assignments reminded me that we will always be able to connect by sharing experiences with each othereven if it has to be through Zoom for now!

Watch the video here.

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About Wake Forest University:

Wake Forest University combines the best traditions of a small liberal arts college with the resources of a large research university. Founded in 1834, the school is located in Winston-Salem, N.C. The Universitys graduate school of arts and sciences, divinity school, and nationally ranked schools of law, medicine and business enrich our intellectual environment. Learn more about Wake Forest University at http://www.wfu.edu.

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Drumming class finds a new rhythm with creative connections - Yes! Weekly

Drumming class finds a new rhythm with creative connections – Wake Forest University News Center

When music professor John Becks Afro-Cuban drumming class moved online, his students didnt miss a beat even though only one of the 17 seniors in his class had access to a drum.

The global drum circle community on social media was quick to offer ideas for virtual groups. One video showed a friend of mine drumming on a picnic table and asking people to play his rhythm back, said Beck.

The students first assignment was based on that video.

I assembled their clips together and posted the recording so they could all see each other like we do in class when we are seated in a circle. One week I asked the students to send me their favorite song, and they recorded themselves drumming on buckets, tables, boxes and metal pots.

In an in-person class there is a sense of community, Beck explains. The group works together creating rhythm, smiling and enjoying the experience. But after spending time immersed in the video projects, looking at the student clips, watching them drum and assembling the projects on his computer, he felt he knew this class better than any other he has taught.

Beck recently completed a 22-month study at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center with stem cell transplant recipients using a protocol developed called Comfort Sound Drumming. During the patient drumming experience, researchers identified improvement in mood, energy and relaxation, and decreases in anxiety, distress and pain.

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Drumming class finds a new rhythm with creative connections - Wake Forest University News Center

Insights on the Worldwide Cell Expansion Industry to 2027 – Analysis and Forecasts – Yahoo Finance UK

Dublin, May 05, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "Cell Expansion Market to 2027 - Global Analysis and Forecasts By Product; Cell Type; Application; End User, and Geography" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

The global cell expansion market is projected to reach US$ 42,837.11 Mn in 2027 from US$ 11,929.43 Mn in 2018. The cell expansion market is expected to grow with a CAGR of 15.6% from 2019-2027.

Driving factors include increasing adoption of regenerative medicines, rising prevalence of cancer. However, the risk contamination during cell expansion is expected to hamper the market during the forecast period.

Cancer is one of the major cause of human death worldwide. In recent years, the cases of cancer have been increasing tremendously and the trend is anticipated to remain the same in the upcoming years. According to the World Health Organization in 2018, approximately 9.6 million deaths across the globe were due to cancer. Furthermore, the National Cancer Institute predicted that in 2018, approximately 1,735,350 new cancer cases would be diagnosed in the US.

Changes in lifestyle have resulted in more exposure to oncogenic factors. Cancer can be cured if diagnosed and treated at an initial stage. Cancer sequencing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods provides more information. Additionally, cell expansion related procedures also aids in research, diagnostics and treatment of cancer.

Furthermore, Asia Pacific region is also facing the problem of the growing prevalence of cancer. The top 15 countries with Cancer prevalence are Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, South Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, China, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Indonesia, Mongolia, India, Laos, and Cambodia. According to the National Institute of Cancer Prevention and Research (NICPR), in 2018, in India, total deaths due to cancer were 784,821.

The global Cell Expansion market is segmented by product, cell type, application, end user. Based on product, the cell expansion market is segmented into consumables and instruments. In 2018, the consumables accounted for the largest market share in the global cell expansion market by product. These consumables are essential components of any laboratory experiment hence they are expected to witness significant growth during the forecast period. Based on cell type, the cell expansion market has been segmented into human cell and animal cell. Furthermore based on application the cell expansion market has been segmented into Regenerative Medicine And Stem Cell Research, Cancer And Cell-Based Research and Other Applications. Based in end user market is segmented into Biopharmaceutical And Biotechnology Companies, Research Institutes, cell banks and others.

Some of the essential primary and secondary sources included in the report are the National Institute of Cancer Prevention and Research (NICPR), Association for Management Education and Development, Center for Cancer Research, International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), National Institute of Cancer Prevention and Research and others.

Reasons to Buy

Key Topics Covered:

1. Introduction

2. Cell Expansion Market - Key Takeaways

3. Research Methodology

4. Cell Expansion- Market Landscape4.1 Overview4.2 PEST Analysis4.3 Expert Opinions

5. Global Cell Expansion Market - Key Market Dynamics5.1 Key Market Drivers5.1.1 Increasing Adoption of Regenerative Medicines5.1.2 Rising Prevalence of Cancer5.2 Key Restraints5.2.1 Risk Contamination During Cell Expansion5.3 Key Opportunity5.3.1 Middle Income Countries Creating Development Opportunities5.4 Future Trend5.4.1 Consistent Research in Drug Discovery Activities5.5 Impact Analysis

6. Cell Expansion Market - Global Analysis6.1 Global Cell Expansion Market Revenue Forecasts And Analysis6.2 Global Cell Expansion Market, By Geography - Forecasts And Analysis6.3 Market Positioning Of Key Players

7. Cell Expansion Market - Revenue And Forecasts To 2027 - Product7.1 Overview7.2 Global Cell Expansion Market, by Product , 2018 & 2027 (% Share)7.3 Consumables7.3.1 Overview7.3.2 Global Consumables Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.3.3 Reagents, Media & Serum7.3.3.1 Overview7.3.3.2 Global Reagents, Media & Serum Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.3.4 Disposables7.3.4.1 Overview7.3.4.2 Global Disposables Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.3.4.3 Culture Tissue Flasks7.3.4.3.1 Overview7.3.4.3.2 Global Culture Tissue Flasks Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.3.4.4 Bioreactor Accessories7.3.4.4.1 Overview7.3.4.4.2 Global Bioreactor Accessories Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.3.4.5 Other Disposables7.3.4.5.1 Overview7.3.4.5.2 Global Other Disposables Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.4 Instruments7.4.1 Overview7.4.2 Global Instruments Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.4.3 Cell Expansion Supporting Equipment7.4.3.1 Overview7.4.3.2 Global Cell Expansion Supporting Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.4.4 Bioreactors7.4.4.1 Overview7.4.4.2 Global Bioreactors Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)7.4.5 Automated Cell Expansion Systems7.4.5.1 Overview7.4.5.2 Global Automated Cell Expansion Systems Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)

8. Cell Expansion Market Analysis and Forecasts to 2027 - Cell Type8.1 Overview8.2 Global Cell Expansion Market, by Cell Type, 2018 & 2027 (% Share)8.3 Human Cells8.3.1 Overview8.3.2 Global Human Cell Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)8.3.3 Adult Stem Cells8.3.3.1 Overview8.3.3.2 Global Adult Stem Cells Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)8.3.4 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells8.3.4.1 Overview8.3.4.2 Global Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)8.3.5 Embryonic Stem Cells8.3.5.1 Overview8.3.5.2 Global Embryonic Stem Cells Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)8.3.6 Differentiated Cells8.3.6.1 Overview8.3.6.2 Global Differentiated Cells Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)8.4 Animal Cells8.4.1 Overview8.4.2 Global Animal Cell Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)

9. Cell Expansion Market Analysis And Forecasts To 2027 - Application9.1 Overview9.2 Global Cell Expansion Market Share by Application 2018 & 2027 (%)9.3 Regenerative Medicine And Stem Cell Research9.3.1 Overview9.3.2 Global Regenerative Medicine And Stem Cell Research Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)9.4 Cancer And Cell-Based Research9.4.1 Overview9.4.2 Global Cancer And Cell-Based research Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)9.5 Other Applications9.5.1 Overview9.5.2 Global Other Applications Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)

10. Cell Expansion Market Analysis And Forecasts To 2027 - End User10.1 Overview10.2 Global Cell Expansion Market Share by End User 2018 & 2027 (%)10.3 Biopharmaceutical And Biotechnology Companies10.3.1 Overview10.3.2 Global Biopharmaceutical And Biotechnology Companies Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)10.4 Research Institutes10.4.1 Overview10.4.2 Global Research Institutes Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)10.5 Cell Banks10.5.1 Overview10.5.2 Global Cell Banks Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)10.6 Other End Users10.6.1 Overview10.6.2 Global Other End Users Market Revenue and Forecast to 2027 (US$ Mn)

11. Cell Expansion Market - Geographic Analysis11.1 North America Cell Expansion Market, Revenue and Forecast to 202711.2 Europe Cell Expansion Market, Revenue and Forecast to 202711.3 APAC Cell Expansion Market, Revenue and Forecast to 202711.4 MEA Cell Expansion Market, Revenue and Forecast to 202711.5 South and Central America Cell Expansion Market, Revenue and Forecast to 2027

12. Cell Expansion Market - Industry Landscape12.1 Overview12.2 Growth Strategies In The Cell Expansion Market, 2017-201912.3 Organic Growth Strategies12.3.1 Overview12.3.1.1 Recent Organic Developments By Players In The Cell Expansion Market12.4 Inorganic Growth Strategies12.4.1 Overview12.4.2 Recent Developments By Players In The Cell Expansion Market

13. Global Cell Expansion Market-Key Company Profiles13.1 BD13.1.1 Key Facts13.1.2 Business Description13.1.3 Financial Overview13.1.4 Product Portfolio13.1.5 SWOT Analysis13.1.6 Key Developments13.2 Merck KGaA13.3 Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.13.4 Terumo Corporation13.5 General Electric Company13.6 Corning Incorporated13.7 Miltenyi Biotec13.8 Danaher13.9 Lonza13.10 STEMCELL Technologies, Inc.

14. Appendix14.1 About the Publisher14.2 Glossary Of Terms

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/hjxwqh

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Insights on the Worldwide Cell Expansion Industry to 2027 - Analysis and Forecasts - Yahoo Finance UK

These 5 Houston-area research institutions have bright minds at work to battle COVID-19 – InnovationMap

Since even the early days of COVID-19's existence, researchers all over the world were rallying to find a cure or potential vaccine which usually take years to make, test, and get approved.

Houston researchers were among this group to put their thinking caps on to come up with solutions to the many problems of the coronavirus. From the testing of existing drugs to tapping into tech to map the disease, here are some research projects that are happening in Houston and are emerging to fight the pandemic.

Baylor College of Medicine has identified a drug that could potentially help heal COVID-19 patients. Photo via bcm.edu

While Baylor College of Medicine has professionals attacking COVID-19 from all angles, one recent discovery at BCM includes a new drug for treating COVID-caused pneumonia.

BCM researchers are looking into Tocilizumab's (TCZ), an immunomodulator drug, effect on patients at Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center and Harris Health System's Ben Taub Hospital.

"The organ most commonly affected by COVID-19 is the lung, causing pneumonia for some patients and leading to difficulty breathing," says Dr. Ivan O. Rosas, chief of the pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine section at BCM, in a news release.

TCZ, which has been used to successfully treat hyperimmune responses in cancer patients being treated with immunotherapy, targets the immune response to the coronavirus. It isn't expected to get rid of the virus, but hopefully will reduce the "cytokine storm," which is described as "the hyper-immune response triggered by the viral pneumonia" in the release.

The randomized clinical trial is looking to treat 330 participants and estimates completion of enrollment early next month and is sponsored by Genentech, a biotechnology company.

A Texas A&M University researcher is trying to figure out if an existing vaccine has an effect on COVID-19. Screenshot via youtube.com

A researcher from Texas A&M University is working with his colleagues on a short-term response to COVID-19. A vaccine, called BDG, has already been deemed safe and used for treatment for bladder cancer. BDG can work to strengthen the immune system.

"It's not going to prevent people from getting infected," says Dr. Jeffrey D. Cirillo, a Regent's Professor of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology at the Texas A&M Health Science Center, in a news release. "This vaccine has the very broad ability to strengthen your immune response. We call it 'trained immunity.'"

A&M leads the study in partnership with the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, as well as Harvard University's School of Public Health and Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Texas A&M Chancellor John Sharp last week set aside $2.5 million from the Chancellor's Research Initiative for the study. This has freed up Cirillo's team's time that was previously being used to apply for grants.

"If there was ever a time to invest in medical research, it is now," Sharp says in the release. "Dr. Cirillo has a head start on a possible coronavirus treatment, and I want to make sure he has what he needs to protect the world from more of the horrible effects of this pandemic."

Currently, the research team is recruiting 1,800 volunteers for the trial that is already underway in College Station and Houston with the potential for expansion in Los Angeles and Boston. Medical professionals interested in the trial can contact Gabriel Neal, MD at gneal@tamu.edu or Jeffrey Cirillo, PhD at jdcirillo@tamu.edu or George Udeani, PharmD DSc at udeani@tamu.edu.

"This could make a huge difference in the next two to three years while the development of a specific vaccine is developed for COVID-19," Cirillo says in the release.

Researchers at Rice University's Center for Research Computing's Spatial Studies Lab have mapped out all cases of COVID-19 across Texas by tapping into public health data. The map, which is accessible at coronavirusintexas.org, also identifies the number of people tested across the state, hospital bed utilization rate, and more.

The project is led by Fars el-Dahdah, director of Rice's Humanities Research Center. El-Dahdah used open source code made available by ESRI and data from the Texas Department of State Health Services and Definitive Healthcare.

"Now that the Texas Division of Emergency Management released its own GIS hub, our dashboard will move away from duplicating information in order to correlate other numbers such as those of available beds and the potential for increasing the number of beds in relation to the location of available COVID providers," el-Dahdah says in a press release.

"We're now adding another layer, which is the number of available nurses," el-Dahdah continues. "Because if this explodes, as a doctor friend recently told me, we could be running out of nurses before running out of beds."

A new compound being developed at Texas Heart Institute could revolutionize the effect of vaccines. Photo via texasheart.org

Molecular technology coming out of the Texas Heart Institute and 7 HIlls Pharma could make vaccines like a potential coronavirus vaccine more effective. The oral integrin activator has been licensed to 7 Hills and is slated to a part of a Phase 1 healthy volunteer study to support solid tumor and infectious disease indications in the fall, according to a press release.

The program is led by Dr. Peter Vanderslice, director of biology at the Molecular Cardiology Research Laboratory at Texas Heart Institute. The compound was first envisioned to improve stem cell therapy for potential use as an immunotherapeutic for certain cancers.

"Our research and clinical colleagues are working diligently every day to advance promising discoveries for at risk patients," says Dr. Darren Woodside, co-inventor and vice president for research at the Texas Heart Institute, in the release. "This platform could be an important therapeutic agent for cardiac and cancer patients as well as older individuals at higher risk for infections."

UH researchers have developed a pliable, thin material that can monitor changes in temperature. Photo via uh.edu

While developed prior to the pandemic, nanotechnology out of the University of Houston could be useful in monitoring COVID patients' temperatures. The material, as described in a paper published by ACS Applied Nano Materials, is made up of carbon nanotubes and can indicate slight body temperature changes. It's thin and pliable, making it ideal for a wearable health tech device.

"Your body can tell you something is wrong before it becomes obvious," says Seamus Curran, a physics professor at the University of Houston and co-author on the paper, in a news release.

Curran's nanotechnology research with fellow researchers Kang-Shyang Liao and Alexander J. Wang, which also has applications in making particle-blocking face masks, began almost 10 years ago.

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These 5 Houston-area research institutions have bright minds at work to battle COVID-19 - InnovationMap

GCC Condemns Israeli Plans to Annex Parts of the West Bank – Asharq Al-awsat English

Secretary-General of the Gulf Cooperation Council Dr. Nayef Falah Mubarak Al-Hajraf stressed the importance of the Council of the Arab League resolution, issued at their meeting at the ministerial level in its extraordinary session on Thursday, condemning the Israeli occupation authorities' implementation of plans to annex any part of the Palestinian territories.

He affirmed the position of the Gulf Cooperation Council on the Palestinian cause as the first Arab and Muslim issue, expressing support for the permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people over all their territories occupied since June 1967.

Hajraf also stressed support for the establishment of an independent Palestinian state with East Jerusalem as its capital, and the necessity of activating the efforts of the international community to resolve the conflict.

He noted that the Israeli decision to annex Palestinian territories occupied in 1967, including the Jordan Valley, the northern Dead Sea, and the lands on which Israeli settlements are located and their surroundings, is a grave breach of the Charter and the resolutions of the United Nations and the principles of international law that prohibits the disposal or annexation of occupied territories

Hajraf also slammed all Israeli policies and practices against the Palestinian people and their sanctities, including what is taking place in occupied East Jerusalem, the recent Israeli aggression aimed at controlling Islamic Waqf lands around the Ibrahim Sanctuary in the occupied Hebron city, and the blockade of the Gaza Strip.

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GCC Condemns Israeli Plans to Annex Parts of the West Bank - Asharq Al-awsat English

Jerusalem residents concerned Israel is changing their residency rights – Arabnews

AMMAN: Palestinian residents of Jerusalem, as well as Syrian residents of the occupied Golan Heights, are complaining that they are facing unprecedented discrimination when traveling home to Israel due to the fact that they dont have Israeli citizenship.

Residents of occupied Jerusalem and the Golan, which were annexed by Israel in 1967 and 1981, have complained that they are being denied the right to board planes to return home without an special ishur (permit).

They have been told that this permit has to be obtained from Israeli embassies or the Israeli Foreign Ministry.

Munir Nuseibah, director of the Community Action Center at Al-Quds University, confirmed the problem and told Arab News that complaints were coming in to the center about Jerusalemites running into problems at airports.

The complaints are very worrisome. It is scary to learn of new Israeli procedures that change what we have been used to for decades.

Khader Abu Alia, an English language teacher at Al-Quds University, told his colleagues at the university that he was barred from entering the country.

He sent a message to members of the Israeli Knesset saying he had needed to travel in mid-March to the US, and that when he boarded the return flight on April 14 he was told that he was not allowed in upon arriving at Ben Gurion Airport passport control, because he didnt have an Israeli passport.

Students trying to board an Israel Airlines flight from Moscow on April 24 were barred and told that only individuals holding Israeli passports would be allowed to travel to Israel.

The problem was later resolved and the students were allowed to travel.

Another problem occurred when students, including from Jerusalem and the Golan Heights, tried and failed to board a plane from Turkey to Israel, and needed the intervention of Arab members of the Knesset before they were allowed to travel back home.

Nuseibah told Arab News that it was unclear if there were any new regulations or if this problem was as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, or if the virus was being used as a cover to pass-through new discriminatory laws.

We have prepared legal action to challenge this new regulation but decided to hold off on this until we find out whether the problems that have been faced by returning Jerusalemites is a one-off bureaucratic problem or a new policy change.

Nuseibah told Arab News that they had contacted Ahmad Tibi, the Israeli Arab member of the Knesset, who reassured him that there had been no change in policy.

We will continue to monitor the situation and check with the Ministry of Interior and the Foreign Ministry before deciding whether there is indeed policy change or not.

If we reach the conclusion that there is a policy change, we will go ahead with the lawsuit that the new policy is a discriminatory one.

Nuseibah concluded that Jerusalemites did not go to Israel but Israel came to Jerusalem and therefore the people of the city have a right to travel and return without any discriminatory regulations.

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Jerusalem residents concerned Israel is changing their residency rights - Arabnews

Four UTSW Researchers Named to The National Academy of Sciences – D Magazine

Four UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have been elected to the The National Academy of Sciences, one of the top honors for American scientists.

Peer scientists selected Sean Morrison, Kim Orth, Michael Rosen, and Sandra Schmid for their original research and achievements. UT Southwestern now has 25 members of the academy, the most of any institution in Texas.

Election to the prestigious National Academy of Sciences recognizes the pioneering contributions these scientists have made to advance our understanding of basic cellular function and molecular processes with application to addressing a broad spectrum of unmet medical needs including cancer and treatments for bacterial infections, said Dr. Daniel K. Podolsky, President of UT Southwestern Medical Center via release. Their election enriches the National Academy of Sciences efforts to provide data and advice on the nations most critical issues in science, health, and medicine.

Morrison is the Director of the Childrens Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern and Professor of Pediatrics and has worked in the fields of stem cell biology and cancer, and has created new methods to purify stem cells and allow them to persist and regenerate after injury. This recognizes, first and foremost, the work of many talented people over the years in my lab, most of whom have now gone on to their own laboratories at UT Southwestern and other institutions. Many of the key insights for the important discoveries that were made came from them so this really recognizes their work. Id also like to acknowledge all my colleagues, all of you at UT Southwestern and at Childrens Health, for the incredible environment that you created for science, Morrison said via release.

Orth is a Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry and has discovered biochemical mechanisms behind many bacterial infections, revealing how pathogens use host cells for their own benefit. I want to thank you all for this wonderful celebration, even though we have to Zoom . Thanks to this amazing institution, UT Southwestern, the wonderful administration including Drs. (Daniel) Podolsky and (David) Russell and the other administrators and staff. As (Chair of Molecular Biology) Eric Olson said, I have moved up the ranks here, starting as a technician, to a student, a postdoc, and now Professor, Orth said via release. And this path has driven my success. Another major key to my success is all of the talented people that have worked in my lab and my mentors, friends, collaborators, and, of course, my family.

Rosen is the Chair of Biophysics and Professor in the Cecil H. and Ida Green Comprehensive Center for Molecular, Computational, and Systems Biology, and investigates how cells compartmentalize processes without the use of membranes. When we began our work on phase separation about a decade ago, it really was not obvious at all whether this was going to be some weird, esoteric little thing that a few proteins did or (if) it was going to become a more general principle in biology. So it wasa tremendous risk that many of us took in making a move in this new direction. More than anything, I want to thank the various people whojoined me in taking this great risk a decade ago that I think has proved to be very much worthwhile, Rosen said via release.

Schmid is the Professor and Chair of Cell Biology and is recognized for her work on endocytosis, or how cells absorb nutrients and other molecules, including the major pathway for uptake within the cell. Ive been lucky to start and end my academic career at two unique institutions, Schmid said via release. As a PhD student in the early 80s, I was supported and challenged by my peers and faculty in the Biochemistry department at Stanford to ask important questions and do the most impactful research. Over decades, the leadership at UT Southwestern has inspired, supported and celebrated the very best research creating a collegial culture that breeds success.

This important recognition by their peers reflects the breadth and quality of research underway at UT Southwestern, and serves as inspiration for new generations of trainees and scientists to carry on the tradition of discovery that is the hallmark of distinguished academic medical centers, said Dr. W. P. Andrew Lee., Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, Provost and Dean of UT Southwestern Medical School via release.

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Four UTSW Researchers Named to The National Academy of Sciences - D Magazine

CHMP Grants Positive Opinion for DARZALEX (daratumumab) Subcutaneous Formulation for the Treatment of Patients with Multiple Myeloma – Yahoo Finance

The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has issued a Positive Opinion recommending approval for DARZALEX (daratumumab) subcutaneous (SC) formulation for the treatment of adult patients with multiple myeloma in frontline and relapsed/refractory settings. The novel SC formulation of daratumumab is co-formulated with recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 (rHuPH20) [Halozyme's ENHANZE drug delivery technology] and reduces treatment time from hours to approximately three to five minutes, with similar efficacy, and fewer infusion-related reactions compared to intravenous (IV) administration.1,2 The CHMPs Positive Opinion for daratumumab SC formulation applies to all current daratumumab indications including newly diagnosed and transplant-ineligible patients, as well as relapsed or refractory patients.

"Despite therapeutic advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma, the time taken for administration of most intravenous treatments is relatively long and there have been few significant improvements over the years," said Maria-Victoria Mateos, M.D., Ph.D., COLUMBA primary investigator and Director of the Myeloma Unit at University Hospital of Salamanca-IBSAL, Salamanca, Spain. "The daratumumab subcutaneous formulation has the potential to transform the treatment experience for patients and physicians as it reduces time in the chair from hours to minutes, and, because it is administered as a fixed dose from the first treatment, it reduces preparation time and chances of error by eliminating the need for dose calculations."

The Positive Opinion is supported by data from the Phase 3 COLUMBA (MMY3012) and Phase 2 PLEIADES (MMY2040) studies presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting and 62nd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting, respectively.1,2 The COLUMBA presentation included a non-inferiority comparison of daratumumab SC formulation to daratumumab IV formulation for co-primary endpoints of overall response rate and maximum Ctrough concentration.1 Furthermore, in a subsequent paper published in The Lancet Haematology, patient-reported treatment satisfaction scores with daratumumab SC versus daratumumab IV were reported using the modified-Cancer Therapy Satisfaction Questionnaire.3 The PLEIADES study evaluated the daratumumab SC formulation in different combination regimens in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma or with relapsed/refractory disease.2

"The subcutaneous formulation of daratumumab showed similar efficacy and fewer infusion-related reactions compared to intravenous daratumumab, and, overall, patients expressed satisfaction with subcutaneous therapy. If approved, we are hopeful this new formulation could offer improved quality of life for patients with multiple myeloma," said Patrick Laroche, M.D., Haematology Therapy Area Lead, Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), Janssen-Cilag. "Janssen is proud to have developed a new formulation to meet the needs of our patients and continue to make a meaningful difference to the lives of those living with multiple myeloma."

"Since its first European approval in 2016, intravenous daratumumab has been used in the treatment of more than 100,000 patients worldwide and, if approved, both new and existing patients with multiple myeloma will be able to start or switch to the subcutaneous formulation as part of their multiple myeloma daratumumab-based treatment regimens," adds Craig Tendler, M.D., Vice President, Clinical Development and Global Medical Affairs, Oncology at Janssen Research & Development, LLC. "Todays Positive Opinion represents Janssens commitment to continuing to improve the treatment experience for patients living with multiple myeloma."

#ENDS#

In Europe, daratumumab is indicated:4

About the COLUMBA Study (MMY3012)3,5The randomised, open-label, multicentre Phase 3 study included 522 patients with multiple myeloma who had received at least three prior lines of therapy including a proteasome inhibitor (PI) and an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD), or whose disease was refractory to both a PI and an IMiD. In the arm that received the subcutaneously (SC) administered formulation of daratumumab (n=263), patients (median age of 65) received a fixed dose of daratumumab 1,800 milligrams (mg) co-formulated with recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 (rHuPH20) 2,000 Units per millilitre (U/mL), SC weekly for cycles 1 2, every two weeks for cycles 3 6, and every four weeks for cycle 7 and thereafter. In the daratumumab IV arm (n=259), patients (median age of 67) received daratumumab for intravenous infusion 16 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) weekly for cycles 1 2, every two weeks for cycles 3 6, and every four weeks for cycle 7 and thereafter. Each cycle was 28 days. Patients in both treatment arms continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Co-primary endpoints were overall response rate (ORR) (non-inferiority = 60 percent retention of the lower bound [208%] of the 95% CI of the SIRIUS trial, with relative risk [RR] analysed by Farrington-Manning test) and pre-dose cycle 3, day 1 (C3D1) daratumumab Ctrough (non-inferiority = lower bound of 90 percent confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of the geometric means [GM] 80%).

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About the PLEIADES Study (MMY2040)6 The non-randomised, open-label, parallel assignment study Phase 2 PLEIADES trial included 240 adults either newly diagnosed or with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. Patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma were treated with 1,800 mg of the subcutaneous formulation in combination with either bortezomib, lenalidomide and dexamethasone (D-VRd) or bortezomib, melphalan and prednisone (D-VMP). Patients with relapsed or refractory disease were treated with 1,800 mg of the subcutaneous formulation plus lenalidomide and dexamethasone (D-Rd). The primary endpoint for the D-VMP and D-Rd cohorts was overall response rate. The primary endpoint for the D-VRd cohort was very good partial response or better rate. An additional cohort of patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma treated with daratumumab plus carfilzomib and dexamethasone was subsequently added to the study.

About daratumumabDaratumumab is a first-in-class7 biologic targeting CD38, a surface protein that is highly expressed across multiple myeloma cells, regardless of disease stage.8 Daratumumab is believed to induce tumour cell death through multiple immune-mediated mechanisms of action, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), as well as through apoptosis, in which a series of molecular steps in a cell lead to its death.4 A subset of myeloid derived suppressor cells (CD38+ MDSCs), CD38+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD38+ B cells (Bregs) were decreased by daratumumab.4 Since launch, it is estimated that 100,000 patients have been treated with daratumumab worldwide.9 Daratumumab is being evaluated in a comprehensive clinical development programme across a range of treatment settings in multiple myeloma, such as in frontline and relapsed settings.10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17 Additional studies are ongoing or planned to assess its potential in other malignant and pre-malignant haematologic diseases in which CD38 is expressed, such as smouldering myeloma.18,19 For more information, please see https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/.

For further information on daratumumab, please see the Summary of Product Characteristics at https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/medicines/human/EPAR/darzalex.

In August 2012, Janssen Biotech, Inc. and Genmab A/S entered a worldwide agreement, which granted Janssen an exclusive licence to develop, manufacture and commercialise daratumumab.20

About Multiple MyelomaMultiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable blood cancer that starts in the bone marrow and is characterised by an excessive proliferation of plasma cells.21 In Europe, more than 48,200 people were diagnosed with MM in 2018, and more than 30,800 patients died.22 Almost 60 percent of patients with MM do not survive more than five years after diagnosis.23

Although treatment may result in remission, unfortunately, patients will most likely relapse as there is currently no cure.24 Refractory MM is when a patients disease progresses within 60 days of their last therapy.25,26 Relapsed cancer is when the disease has returned after a period of initial, partial or complete remission.27 While some patients with MM have no symptoms at all, most patients are diagnosed due to symptoms that can include bone problems, low blood counts, calcium elevation, kidney problems or infections.28 Patients who relapse after treatment with standard therapies, including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, have poor prognoses and few treatment options available.29

About the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & JohnsonAt Janssen, were creating a future where disease is a thing of the past. Were the Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, working tirelessly to make that future a reality for patients everywhere by fighting sickness with science, improving access with ingenuity, and healing hopelessness with heart. We focus on areas of medicine where we can make the biggest difference: Cardiovascular & Metabolism, Immunology, Infectious Diseases & Vaccines, Neuroscience, Oncology, and Pulmonary Hypertension.

Learn more at http://www.janssen.com/emea. Follow us at http://www.twitter.com/janssenEMEA for our latest news. Janssen-Cilag, Janssen Research & Development, LLC and Janssen Biotech, Inc. are part of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson.

Cautions Concerning Forward-Looking StatementsThis press release contains "forward-looking statements" as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding the benefits of daratumumab for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma. The reader is cautioned not to rely on these forward-looking statements. These statements are based on current expectations of future events. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or known or unknown risks or uncertainties materialise, actual results could vary materially from the expectations and projections of Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies and/or Johnson & Johnson. Risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: challenges and uncertainties inherent in product research and development, including the uncertainty of clinical success and of obtaining regulatory approvals; uncertainty of commercial success; manufacturing difficulties and delays; competition, including technological advances, new products and patents attained by competitors; challenges to patents; product efficacy or safety concerns resulting in product recalls or regulatory action; changes in behaviour and spending patterns of purchasers of health care products and services; changes to applicable laws and regulations, including global health care reforms; and trends toward health care cost containment. A further list and descriptions of these risks, uncertainties and other factors can be found in Johnson & Johnson's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 29, 2019, including in the sections captioned "Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements" and "Item 1A. Risk Factors," and in the companys most recently filed Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, and the companys subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Copies of these filings are available online at http://www.sec.gov, http://www.jnj.com or on request from Johnson & Johnson. None of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies nor Johnson & Johnson undertakes to update any forward-looking statement as a result of new information or future events or developments.

ENHANZE is a registered trademark of Halozyme.

# # #

References

1 Mateos MV, Nahi H, Legiec W, et al. Efficacy and safety of the randomized, open-label, non-inferiority, phase 3 study of subcutaneous (SC) versus intravenous (IV) daratumumab (DARA) administration in patients (pts) with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM): COLUMBA. J Clin Oncol. 2019;37(Suppl.): abstract 8005.2 Chari A, San-Miguel J, McCarthy H, et al. Subcutaneous daratumumab plus standard treatment regimens in patients with multiple myeloma across lines of therapy: Pleiades study update. Blood. 2019;134(Suppl.1):abstract 3152.3 Mateos MV, Nahi H, Legiec W, et al. Subcutaneous versus intravenous daratumumab in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (COLUMBA): a multicentre, open-label, non-inferiority, randomised, phase 3 trial. Lancet Haematol. 2020 Mar 23 [epub ahead of print].4 European Medicines Agency. DARZALEX summary of product characteristics. Available at:https://www.ema.europa.eu/documents/product-information/darzalex-epar-productinformation_en.pdf Last accessed April 2020.5 ClinicalTrials.gov. A Study of Subcutaneous Versus (vs.) Intravenous Administration of Daratumumab in Participants With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma. NCT03277105. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03277105 Last accessed April 2020.6 ClinicalTrials.gov. A Study to Evaluate Subcutaneous Daratumumab in Combination With Standard Multiple Myeloma Treatment Regimens. NCT03412565. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03412565 Last accessed April 2020.7 Sanchez L, Wang Y, Siegel DS, Wang ML. Daratumumab: a first-in-class CD38 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of multiple myeloma. J Hematol Oncol. 2016;9:51.8 Fedele G, di Girolamo M, Recine U, et al. CD38 ligation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of myeloma patients induces release of protumorigenic IL-6 and impaired secretion of IFNgamma cytokines and proliferation. Mediat Inflamm. 2013;2013:564687.9 [Data on file]. DARZALEX: New Patient Starts Launch to Date. RF-8220310 ClinicalTrials.gov. A study to evaluate daratumumab in transplant eligible participants with previously untreated multiple myeloma (Cassiopeia). NCT02541383. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02541383 Last accessed April 202011 ClinicalTrials.gov. A study comparing daratumumab, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. NCT02076009. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02076009 Last accessed April 2020.12 ClinicalTrials.gov. Addition of daratumumab to combination of bortezomib and dexamethasone in participants with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. NCT02136134. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02136134 Last accessed April 2020.13 ClinicalTrials.gov. A study of combination of daratumumab and Velcade (bortezomib) melphalan-prednisone (DVMP) compared to Velcade melphalan-prednisone (VMP) in participants with previously untreated multiple myeloma. NCT02195479. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02195479 Last accessed April 2020.14 ClinicalTrials.gov. Study comparing daratumumab, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in participants with previously untreated multiple myeloma. NCT02252172. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02252172 Last accessed April 2020.15 ClinicalTrials.gov. A study of Velcade (bortezomib) melphalan-prednisone (VMP) compared to daratumumab in combination with VMP (D-VMP), in participants with previously untreated multiple myeloma who are ineligible for high-dose therapy (Asia Pacific region). NCT03217812. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03217812 Last accessed April 2020.16 ClinicalTrials.gov. Comparison of pomalidomide and dexamethasone with or without daratumumab in subjects with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma previously treated with lenalidomide and a proteasome inhibitor daratumumab/pomalidomide/dexamethasone vs pomalidomide/dexamethasone (EMN14). NCT03180736. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03180736 Last accessed April 2020.17 ClinicalTrials.gov. Study of carfilzomib, daratumumab and dexamethasone for patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma (CANDOR). NCT03158688. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03158688 Last accessed April 2020.18 ClinicalTrials.gov. A study to evaluate 3 dose schedules of daratumumab in participants with smoldering multiple myeloma. NCT02316106. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02316106 Last accessed April 2020.19 ClinicalTrials.gov. An efficacy and safety proof of concept study of daratumumab in relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. NCT02413489. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02413489 Last accessed April 2020.20 Johnson & Johnson. Janssen Biotech announces global license and development agreement for investigational anti-cancer agent daratumumab. Press release August 30, 2012. Available at: https://www.jnj.com/media-center/press-releases/janssen-biotech-announces-global-license-and-development-agreement-for-investigational-anti-cancer-agent-daratumumab Last accessed April 2020.21 American Society of Clinical Oncology. Multiple myeloma: introduction. Available at: https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/multiple-myeloma/introduction Last accessed April 2020.22 GLOBOCAN 2018. Cancer Today Population Factsheets: Europe Region. Available at: https://gco.iarc.fr/today/data/factsheets/populations/908-europe-fact-sheets.pdf Last accessed April 2020.23 De Angelis R, Minicozzi P, Sant M, et al. Survival variations by country and age for lymphoid and myeloid malignancies in Europe 2000-2007: results of EUROCARE-5 population-based study. Eur J Cancer. 2015;51:2254-68.24 Abdi J, Chen G, Chang H, et al. Drug resistance in multiple myeloma: latest findings and new concepts on molecular mechanisms. Oncotarget. 2013;4:2186207.25 National Cancer Institute. NCI dictionary of cancer terms: refractory. Available at: https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms?CdrID=350245 Last accessed April 2020.26 Richardson P, Mitsiades C, Schlossman R, et al. The treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2007:317-23.27 National Cancer Institute. NCI dictionary of cancer terms: relapsed. Available at: https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms?CdrID=45866 Last accessed April 2020.28 American Cancer Society. Multiple myeloma: early detection, diagnosis and staging. Available at: https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/CRC/PDF/Public/8740.00.pdf Last accessed April 2020.29 Kumar SK, Lee JH, Lahuerta JJ, et al. Risk of progression and survival in multiple myeloma relapsing after therapy with IMiDs and bortezomib: a multicenter international myeloma working group study. Leukemia. 2012;26:149-57.

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CHMP Grants Positive Opinion for DARZALEX (daratumumab) Subcutaneous Formulation for the Treatment of Patients with Multiple Myeloma - Yahoo Finance

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Since even the early days of COVID-19's existence, researchers all over the world were rallying to find a cure or potential vaccine which usually take years to make, test, and get approved.

Houston researchers were among this group to put their thinking caps on to come up with solutions to the many problems of the coronavirus. From the testing of existing drugs to tapping into tech to map the disease, here are some research projects that are happening in Houston and are emerging to fight the pandemic.

Baylor College of Medicine has identified a drug that could potentially help heal COVID-19 patients. Photo via bcm.edu

While Baylor College of Medicine has professionals attacking COVID-19 from all angles, one recent discovery at BCM includes a new drug for treating COVID-caused pneumonia.

BCM researchers are looking into Tocilizumab's (TCZ), an immunomodulator drug, effect on patients at Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center and Harris Health System's Ben Taub Hospital.

"The organ most commonly affected by COVID-19 is the lung, causing pneumonia for some patients and leading to difficulty breathing," says Dr. Ivan O. Rosas, chief of the pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine section at BCM, in a news release.

TCZ, which has been used to successfully treat hyperimmune responses in cancer patients being treated with immunotherapy, targets the immune response to the coronavirus. It isn't expected to get rid of the virus, but hopefully will reduce the "cytokine storm," which is described as "the hyper-immune response triggered by the viral pneumonia" in the release.

The randomized clinical trial is looking to treat 330 participants and estimates completion of enrollment early next month and is sponsored by Genentech, a biotechnology company.

A Texas A&M University researcher is trying to figure out if an existing vaccine has an effect on COVID-19. Screenshot via youtube.com

A researcher from Texas A&M University is working with his colleagues on a short-term response to COVID-19. A vaccine, called BDG, has already been deemed safe and used for treatment for bladder cancer. BDG can work to strengthen the immune system.

"It's not going to prevent people from getting infected," says Dr. Jeffrey D. Cirillo, a Regent's Professor of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology at the Texas A&M Health Science Center, in a news release. "This vaccine has the very broad ability to strengthen your immune response. We call it 'trained immunity.'"

A&M leads the study in partnership with the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, as well as Harvard University's School of Public Health and Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Texas A&M Chancellor John Sharp last week set aside $2.5 million from the Chancellor's Research Initiative for the study. This has freed up Cirillo's team's time that was previously being used to apply for grants.

"If there was ever a time to invest in medical research, it is now," Sharp says in the release. "Dr. Cirillo has a head start on a possible coronavirus treatment, and I want to make sure he has what he needs to protect the world from more of the horrible effects of this pandemic."

Currently, the research team is recruiting 1,800 volunteers for the trial that is already underway in College Station and Houston with the potential for expansion in Los Angeles and Boston. Medical professionals interested in the trial can contact Gabriel Neal, MD at gneal@tamu.edu or Jeffrey Cirillo, PhD at jdcirillo@tamu.edu or George Udeani, PharmD DSc at udeani@tamu.edu.

"This could make a huge difference in the next two to three years while the development of a specific vaccine is developed for COVID-19," Cirillo says in the release.

Researchers at Rice University's Center for Research Computing's Spatial Studies Lab have mapped out all cases of COVID-19 across Texas by tapping into public health data. The map, which is accessible at coronavirusintexas.org, also identifies the number of people tested across the state, hospital bed utilization rate, and more.

The project is led by Fars el-Dahdah, director of Rice's Humanities Research Center. El-Dahdah used open source code made available by ESRI and data from the Texas Department of State Health Services and Definitive Healthcare.

"Now that the Texas Division of Emergency Management released its own GIS hub, our dashboard will move away from duplicating information in order to correlate other numbers such as those of available beds and the potential for increasing the number of beds in relation to the location of available COVID providers," el-Dahdah says in a press release.

"We're now adding another layer, which is the number of available nurses," el-Dahdah continues. "Because if this explodes, as a doctor friend recently told me, we could be running out of nurses before running out of beds."

A new compound being developed at Texas Heart Institute could revolutionize the effect of vaccines. Photo via texasheart.org

Molecular technology coming out of the Texas Heart Institute and 7 HIlls Pharma could make vaccines like a potential coronavirus vaccine more effective. The oral integrin activator has been licensed to 7 Hills and is slated to a part of a Phase 1 healthy volunteer study to support solid tumor and infectious disease indications in the fall, according to a press release.

The program is led by Dr. Peter Vanderslice, director of biology at the Molecular Cardiology Research Laboratory at Texas Heart Institute. The compound was first envisioned to improve stem cell therapy for potential use as an immunotherapeutic for certain cancers.

"Our research and clinical colleagues are working diligently every day to advance promising discoveries for at risk patients," says Dr. Darren Woodside, co-inventor and vice president for research at the Texas Heart Institute, in the release. "This platform could be an important therapeutic agent for cardiac and cancer patients as well as older individuals at higher risk for infections."

UH researchers have developed a pliable, thin material that can monitor changes in temperature. Photo via uh.edu

While developed prior to the pandemic, nanotechnology out of the University of Houston could be useful in monitoring COVID patients' temperatures. The material, as described in a paper published by ACS Applied Nano Materials, is made up of carbon nanotubes and can indicate slight body temperature changes. It's thin and pliable, making it ideal for a wearable health tech device.

"Your body can tell you something is wrong before it becomes obvious," says Seamus Curran, a physics professor at the University of Houston and co-author on the paper, in a news release.

Curran's nanotechnology research with fellow researchers Kang-Shyang Liao and Alexander J. Wang, which also has applications in making particle-blocking face masks, began almost 10 years ago.

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