Category Archives: Stem Cell Medicine

Study highlights the need to adhere to more uniform diagnostic criteria for rare lymphoma – News-Medical.net

In what is believed to be one of the largest studies of a rare disorder known as primary cutaneous gamma delta T-cell lymphoma (PCGDTCL), Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey investigators and other collaborators examined characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes of the disease, and determined accurate diagnosis of the disease requires ongoing analysis. Results of the work are being shared as part of a poster presentation at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting in Orlando later this week by lead investigator Kevin David, MD, hematologist/oncologist at Rutgers Cancer Institute. Dr. David, who is also an assistant professor of medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, shares more about the work.

Q: Why is this topic important to explore?

A: Primary cutaneous gamma delta T-cell lymphoma is a rare disorder, and in comparison to other more common subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, relatively little is known about prognostic factors and optimal treatments. Although it is a rare condition, it can in many instances behave quite aggressively and profoundly impact patients. Therefore, learning more about how this disease behaves, which disease characteristics affect outcomes, and which treatments may improve outcomes are all important to understand more fully.

Q: Tell us about the work and what you and your colleagues found.

A: Given the rarity of this particular lymphoma, collaboration with lymphoma researchers across the country was key in this study. We identified cases of PCGDTCL at 10 U.S. medical centers that occurred between 2000 and 2017, and collected information about patient characteristics, pathology characteristics, treatments administered, and outcomes, including remission rates and the length of time the disease was controlled. Although it is ideal for lymphomas to be diagnosed with uniform standards across the country, we found important nuances in the manner in which pathologists at different medical centers diagnose this rare lymphoma. Identifying these differences will be key to better streamline diagnoses in the future. We also found that patients in better overall health, as measured by the ECOG Performance Status scale, and with normal, as opposed to increased, levels of a tumor marker (lactate dehydrogenase) had better outcomes.

There is no one standard treatment regimen for this lymphoma, and a wide variety of treatments were used for newly diagnosed patients, ranging from ultraviolet light treatment to multi-agent chemotherapy. While no single treatment regimen resulted in the best outcomes, our results suggest that incorporating allogeneic stem cell transplant in treatment planning can improve results.

Q: Why are these results significant?

A: Our findings demonstrate the importance of trying to create and adhere to more uniform diagnostic criteria for this rare lymphoma. Additionally, we have much work to do in identifying better treatment regimens to improve outcomes for PCGDTCL, and continued multi-center collaborations will be crucial.

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Study highlights the need to adhere to more uniform diagnostic criteria for rare lymphoma - News-Medical.net

100 hospitals and health systems with great orthopedic programs | 2019 – Becker’s Hospital Review

Laura Dyrda and Angie Stewart - Wednesday, December 4th, 2019Print|Email

The hospitals featured on Becker's Hospital Review's 100 hospitals and health systems with great orthopedic programs list for 2019 have earned recognition for quality of care and patient satisfaction for orthopedic and spine surgery.

Many are high-volume centers where surgeons annually perform hundreds, and in some cases thousands, of total joint replacements, in addition to less complex musculoskeletal surgeries. Theseprograms highlighted have rich histories of innovation and have won grants to research musculoskeletal treatments. The centers also include robust nonoperative services and provide care to professional and elite athletes in their communities.

Our editorial team accepted nominations for this list and took several rankings and awards into consideration, includingU.S. News & World Reportrankings for adult and pediatric orthopedics. The team also considered CareChex rankings, Healthgrades awards, Leapfrog, Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Distinction Center designation, The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval and hospitals' reputations for innovation in orthopedic care.

Note: Hospitals and health systems cannot pay for inclusion on this list, and organizations are listed in alphabetical order.

For questions or comments about this list, contact Laura Dyrda atldyrda@beckershealthcare.com.You can nominate a hospital or health system for the 2020 list here.

Abbott Northwestern Hospital (Minneapolis). The Orthopaedic Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital includes specialists in joint replacement, spine surgery and sports medicine. The hospital's joint replacement center has a 90 percent patient satisfaction rating of good to excellent care and has earned the Blue Distinction Center for Knee and Hip Replacement designation from Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. The hospital, a member of Allina Health, ranks among U.S. News & World Report's top 50 hospitals for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20. The hospital's surgeons perform around 4,000 orthopedic procedures annually.

Atrium Health (Charlotte, N.C.). The Atrium Health Musculoskeletal Institute has 10 locations systemwide and an orthopedic residency top ranked by Doximity. It is a collaboration with more than 200 physicians involved in more than 20 externally funded research trials. It is also part of the Major Extremity Trauma and Rehabilitation Consortium, with more than 7,000 patients enrolled across 18 projects. The health system, which includes 40 hospitals and 900 care sites, has had hospitals ranked among the top orthopedic programs in the nation by U.S. News & World Report and supports research and clinical trials for new orthopedic treatments.

Banner Health (Phoenix). Banner Health's orthopedic program spans hospitals in Phoenix, Tucson and Northern Colorado. The health system partners with Phoenix-based The CORE Institute and the Banner CORE Center for Orthopedics to streamline the continuum of care. The center includes orthopedic surgeons as well as integrated services such as inpatient and outpatient therapy. The two groups have a history together, partnering on co-management agreements and joint ventures on outpatient clinic locations.

Baptist Health Care / Andrews Institute (Pensacola, Fla.). The Gulf Breeze, Fla.-based Andrews Institute, an affiliate of Baptist Health Care, was founded by renowned orthopedic surgeon James Andrews, MD, who treats elite athletes. The institute has 34 physicians on staff and provides care at nine locations. The Andrews Institute is also designated a Blue Distinction Center+ for knee and hip replacement surgery from Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and received an 'excellent' rating in the third year of participating in Medicare's Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement quality performance category. Many of the physicians also participate in the Andrews Research and Education Foundation, which received a $1 million grant from the state for two consecutive years to support its research into regenerative medicine.

Barnes-Jewish Hospital (St. Louis). The orthopedic department at Barnes-Jewish Hospital includes team physicians for the St. Louis Blues and Washington University athletics, in addition to other local teams. It supports joint replacement and preservation, spine and sports medicine as well as orthopedic concierge services. The National Institutes of Health has granted the orthopedic surgery departments research funding for its projects, which include basic science and clinical research. The hospital has earned the Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for hip and knee joint replacement and its surgeons perform more than 1,100 procedures annually.

Baystate Medical Center (Springfield, Mass.). Baystate Medical Center's orthopedic services include the Baystate Orthopedic Surgery Center and services from New England Orthopedic Surgeons. The practice includes 18 physicians and 180 employees who focus on spine, sports medicine and joint replacements. The hospital has computer-assisted technology for orthopedic procedures.

Beaumont Hospital (Royal Oak, Mich.). Beaumont Hospital's orthopedic surgeons perform around 8,500 joints per year, typically using minimally invasive techniques. It also serves as a learning institution, and surgeons come from around the nation to its Applebaum Simulation Learning Institute for training in new techniques. U.S. News & World Report ranked Beaumont Hospital among the top 30 orthopedic hospitals in the nation. The hospital's clinicians also focus on research, including basic science studies and FDA clinical trials. Areas of interest for research include biomechanics, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and joint wear simulation.

Bethesda North Hospital (Cincinnati). Bethesda North Hospital Orthopedics, part of TriHealth, has had the Anthem Blue Distinction Centers for Knee and Hip Replacement recognition and Aenta's Institute for Quality Orthopedic Care for Total Joint Replacement honor since 2010. TriHealth's Orthopedics & Sports Institute, which has locations at multiple system hospitals, earned the first Joint Commission Gold Seal Award for advanced hip and knee certification and its physicians serve professional athletes for the Cincinnati Reds and Bengals.

Boston Children's Hospital. Surgeons and clinicians at Boston Children's Hospital attend to more than 100,000 patient visits and perform 6,000 surgeries annually. The hospital's orthopedics department dates to 1903 and has now grown to include 13 specialty clinics and urgent care facilities throughout Massachusetts. The hospital also supports the Orthopedic Center's Research & Innovations Department, which includes a focus on spine surgery and joint preservations. The hospital is a leader in hip preservation surgery, having performed more than 1,200 periacetabular osteotomies. Its sports medicine injury clinic also includes 40,000 patient visits per year. For 2019-20, U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital No. 1 for pediatric orthopedic care.

Boston Medical Center. Boston Medical Center's department of orthopedic surgery is affiliated with Boston University School of Medicine and works with the specialists to provide orthopedic care and support research in the orthopedic space. The department includes 11 orthopedic and trauma surgeons that focus on joint replacements, spine and fracture care.

Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston). The department of orthopedic surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital traces its roots to 1980 and has since grown to include around 40 orthopedic surgeons who specialize in joint reconstruction, sports medicine and spine, among other subspecialties. The department is also dedicated to education and trains around 60 orthopedic residents per year. The hospital's surgeons also engage in research through the Musculoskeletal Research Center within the Brigham Research Institute for cross-collaborative projects.

Carilion Roanoke (Va.) Memorial Hospital. Carilion Clinic supports the orthopedic services at multiple locations of the Institute for Orthopaedics and Neurosciences, including at Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital. The academic orthopedic practice has more than 50 trained providers and pioneers minimally invasive techniques. Carilion Clinic surgeons perform more than 1,500 hip and knee replacements annually and have maintained The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for quality care award since 2007. The organization also has a robust sports medicine team that performs more than 12,000 surgical procedures per year and cares for athletes at six colleges and universities.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Los Angeles). Cedars-Sinai supports the Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute, which includes team physicians for the Los Angeles Clippers and Rams. NRC Health voted Cedars-Sinai No. 1 for quality medicine in Los Angeles and U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital No. 3 in the nation for orthopedics in 2019-20. Cedars-Sinai also focuses on medical training, and more than 600 medical students apply for its orthopedic residency program each year.

Children's Hospital Los Angeles. The Children's Orthopaedic Center at CHLA has programs in spine, hip preservation and sports medicine. The sports medicine specialists are also physicians for the L.A. Galaxy professional soccer team and have access to the John C. Wilson, Jr. Motion and Sports Analysis Laboratory. The center includes surgical and non-surgical specialists at the main hospital as well as five outpatient locations. U.S. News & World Report ranked Children's Hospital Los Angeles among the top five hospitals in the nation for pediatric orthopedics in 2019-20.

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The division of orthopedics at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia includes 31 orthopedic surgeons focused on specialties from spine to sports medicine and joint pain. The program has served pediatric patients into adulthood for more than 120 years and its specialists also engage in research about treating pediatric orthopedic conditions. U.S. News & World Report ranked Children's Hospital of Philadelphia among the top five hospitals in the nation for pediatric orthopedics.

Children's Medical Center Dallas - Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children. Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children is dedicated to pediatric orthopedic cases as well as children with neurological disorders. The hospital includes six centers of excellence known for providing innovative solutions to spine care, limb lengthening and other disorders. The hospital is also committed to research to develop new solutions for scoliosis treatment, concussion management and other conditions. U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital among the top five in the nation for pediatric orthopedics in 2019-20.

Christ Hospital (Cincinnati). The Christ Hospital Health Network Joint & Spine Center provides care for patients with simple and complex orthopedic conditions. It has 87 private inpatient rooms, 12 outpatient rooms and space for physical and occupational therapy. The health system also offers bundled services for select spine and joint replacement procedures through its centers of excellence program. Individuals and employers can pay one fixed cost for procedures that include the episode of care as well as postoperative therapy. The health system also has three outpatient surgery centers focused on orthopedic and spine procedures, with the most recent having opened in January 2018.

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. The division of orthopedics at Cincinnati Children's Hospital focuses on patients with fractures, scoliosis, neuromuscular conditions and more. The division has 14 orthopedic surgeons who are also involved in research as a core tenet of their professional mission. The research includes microbiology and biomechanics as well as improvements to clinical care. U.S. News & World Report named Cincinnati Children's Hospital among the top five hospitals in the nation for pediatric orthopedics in 2019-20.

Cleveland Clinic. Cleveland Clinic's orthopedic surgeons focus on simple and complex joint procedures. They perform more than 7,000 hip, knee, shoulder, ankle, elbow, wrist and finger replacements per year. Cleveland Clinic also has among the highest volume of patients in the nation for severe osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis as well as trauma. Cleveland Clinic's Orthopaedic & Rheumatologic Institute has around 168 clinicians, including physicians. U.S. News & World Report ranked two Cleveland Clinic hospitals among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics in 2019-20.

Duke University Hospital (Durham, N.C.). Duke University Hospital's department of orthopedic surgery includes 83 orthopedic faculty and 40 orthopedic residents. The academic medical center also has 17 orthopedic clinical fellows and 29 research trainees. The orthopedic department treated 175,824 patients in 2017, the last data available, and performed 16,440 procedures. U.S. News & World Report ranked Duke University Hospital among the top 25 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20.

Emory University Hospital (Atlanta). Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center is the official sports medicine provider for the Atlanta Hawks, Braves, Falcons and Harlem Globetrotters. The hospital broke ground in October on the new Emory Musculoskeletal Institute in Brookhaven, Ga., a 180,000-square-foot, LEED-certified building designed for orthopedic and spine cases. The new building is expected to open in 2021 and provide more environmentally friendly care.

Erlanger Health System (Chattanooga, Tenn.). Erlanger Orthopaedic Institute's surgeons are on the faculty of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine and participate in clinical trials for joint replacement and fracture care. The health system also has a Bone Health Clinic and Ortho Symposium. The Joint Commission granted Erlanger Orthopaedic Institute its Gold Seal of Approval as a Certified Center of Excellence for Primary Hip and Knee Replacements.

Hackensack (N.J.) University Medical Center. The Orthopedic Institute at Hackensack University Medical Center has more than 50 physicians and healthcare professionals on staff. The institute's Center for Joint Replacement offers tailored care plans for patients, and 96 percent of patients are able to stand or walk on the same night as their procedure. The health system boasts a 1.9 percent 30-day readmission rates for orthopedic patients, and 80 percent of them are discharged home. U.S. News & World Report named Hackensack University Hospital among the high performing hospitals for knee and hip replacement in 2019-20. Healthgrades also rated it among America's 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery and Joint Replacement.

Hoag Orthopedic Institute (Irvine, Calif.). Hoag Orthopedic Institute was developed through a partnership between Orange County physicians and Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian. The hospital has 70 beds and nine operating rooms dedicated to orthopedics. HOI also has more than 300 specialty physicians, including 93 orthopedic surgeons. In 2018, the hospital reported 5,509 orthopedic surgeries while HOI's ASC performed 12,454. The hospital participates in bundled payments for orthopedics and reports a 1.4 percent complication rate for total hip and knee replacements, well below the 2.5 percent national average.

Hospital for Special Surgery (New York City). Hospital for Special Surgery has been ranked the top hospital in the nation for orthopedic surgery by U.S. News & World Report for the past 10 years, most recently in 2019-20. Founded in 1863, the hospital focuses on orthopedics and rheumatology, and its surgeons perform more than 32,000 procedures per year. It is also the highest volume hip and knee replacement hospital in the nation. The hospital also focuses on innovation, opening the HSS Research Institute, which comprises 20 laboratories and 300 staff members dedicated to musculoskeletal health. HSS physicians hold faculty appointments at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, instructing residents in musculoskeletal health.

Houston Methodist Hospital. Surgeons at Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine perform more than 20,000 orthopedic procedures per year. The staff have more than 100 years of experience in orthopedics, including minimally invasive techniques. The health system's sports medicine physicians are the official healthcare providers for the Houston Texans and Houston Astros. U.S. News & World Report named Houston Methodist Hospital among the top 15 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20.

Huntington Hospital (Pasadena, Calif.). Huntington Orthopedics Institute participates in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model from CMS. It has been recognized by Blue Cross Blue Shield Association as a Blue Distinction Center for Knee and Hip Replacement. U.S. News & World Report also recognized the hospital in 2019-20 for musculoskeletal care, ranking it among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics.

Indiana University Medical Center (Indianapolis). The IU School of Medicine's department of orthopedic surgery was established in 1948 and has grown into a full academic department with a research arm that receives $5.4 million in funding, with another $3.5 million pending. NIH recently provided a $1.8 million grant to the department to study mobile compression devices that would prevent deep vein thrombosis after knee replacement surgery. The orthopedic department includes 32 full-time faculty as well as 29 graduate students and 50 supporting staff.

Inova Mount Vernon Hospital (Alexandria, Va.). Patients from across the U.S. travel to Inova Mount Vernon Hospital for orthopedic care. The hospital's surgeons perform more than 2,000 hip, knee, shoulder and ankle replacements annually. The Inova Joint Replacement Center earned The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for outstanding care in joint replacement and is a UnitedHealthcare Center of Excellence for Joint Replacement.

Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore). Founded in 1900, the Johns Hopkins department of orthopedic surgery has evolved to include joint replacements, spine, trauma and sports medicine. The specialists are also focused on research and participate in clinical trials as well as basic and translational research. U.S. News & World Report named Johns Hopkins Hospital among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20.

John Muir Health (Walnut Creek, Calif.). Quality and transparency are important aspects of the orthopedics program at John Muir Health. It participates in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement program, a five-year bundled payment program making it responsible for the quality and cost of care. It also offers voluntary participation in the California Joint Replacement Registry, which tracks results for total hip and knee surgeries to provide better care to patients in the future. The health system is designated as Blue Distinction Center for Knee and Hip Replacement by Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and its Walnut Creek (Calif.) Medical Center is ranked among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report for 2019-20.

Keck Hospital of USC (Los Angeles). The department of orthopedic surgery at Keck Hospital of USC has a mission to provide quality care and educate the next generation of orthopedic surgeons. Its orthopedic surgeons are also focused on research, including investigations into stem cell therapy for cartilage repair and biomechanical research. The Epstein Family Foundation also donated $10 million to name the USC Epstein Family Center for Sports Medicine in 2018; the center serves athletes in the community and physicians at the center serve as official doctors for USC Trojan athletes.

Lahey Hospital and Medical Center (Burlington, Mass.). Lahey Hospital and Medical Center has collected data on total joint replacement patients since 1988 and conducts academic reviews of the data to improve the care delivery process. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association has designated the hospital a Blue Distinction Center for Knee and Hip Replacement and serves as the teaching hospital for Boston University's Orthopaedic Surgery Resident Training Program. Orthopedic surgeons from its sports medicine center treat professional and amateur athletes.

Lehigh Valley Health Network (Allentown, Pa.). The Centers for Orthopedic Medicine at Lehigh Valley Health Network includes fellowship-trained joint replacement and sports medicine surgeons. The physicians lead a team of 400 experts across specialties and sports performance. It has earned the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Blue Distinction Center+ for hip and knee replacements and Aetna's Institute of Quality in orthopedics. U.S. News & World Report also ranked Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics in 2019-20.

Loyola Medicine (Maywood, Ill.). Loyola Medicine takes a multidisciplinary approach to orthopedic care. The health system reports around 85 percent to 90 percent of knee replacement surgeries performed there are successful for 10 years or more. The system also has a robust sports medicine department with team consultants for major associations, including the U.S. Soccer Federation and U.S.A. Hockey.

Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston). Surgeons in the department of orthopedic surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital treat the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions, seeing more than 80,000 patients each year. Spine, trauma and joint replacement specialists treat patients at Massachusetts General, which also has a robust sports medicine department that is home to the team physicians for the Boston Red Sox, New England Patriots and Boston Bruins. U.S. News & World Report ranked Massachusetts General Hospital among the top 10 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20.

Mayo Clinic Health System (Rochester, Minn.). Mayo Clinic is a national leader in orthopedics, with more than 80 orthopedic surgeons spanning its locations in Rochester, Phoenix, and Jacksonville, Fla. The W. Hall Wendel Jr. Musculoskeletal Center at Mayo Clinic's flagship campus in Rochester opened in 2007 and includes 57 exam rooms as well as an outpatient surgical center and ancillary services. Its surgeons also have a mission for education, traveling internationally to train surgeons as well as working with residents and fellows. U.S. News & World Report ranked Mayo's locations in Rochester and Phoenix among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20.

MedStar (Columbia, Md.). MedStar Orthopaedic Institute has more than 80 physicians and 20 locations across the health system's coverage area. Its specialists focus on minimally invasive treatments and have earned The Joint commission's advanced certification in hip, knee and spine surgery. U.S. News & World Report also ranks two MedStar hospitals as high performing in knee replacement. The health system has a robust sports medicine program and serves as the official medical providers for the Baltimore Ravens, Washington Capitals, Washington Wizards and Baltimore Orioles.

Memorial Hermann (Houston). Memorial Hermann's orthopedic services include the Memorial Hermann Joint Centers, offered at eight locations across the system, as well as the Ironman Sport Medicine Institute at four locations focusing on athletic training, biomechanics and sports injuries. The Joint Center physicians perform around 3,000 hip and knee replacements annually. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association has also designated Memorial Hermann Southwest a Blue Distinction Center for Knee and Hip Replacement. The health system also includes the Memorial Hermann Orthopedic & Spine Hospital, which has 64 patient rooms and 10 surgical suites. The Center for Advanced Orthopedics at Memorial Hermann Memorial City Medical Center is a 90,000-square-foot facility where surgeons perform more than 4,100 orthopedic surgeries per year.

MemorialCare (Laguna Hills, Calif.). MemorialCare has a broad orthopedic program across its health system, with the Saddleback Medical Center earning a spot on the U.S. News & World Report's top 50 hospitals for orthopedics in the U.S. for 2019-20. Saddleback reports a 98 percent success rate for orthopedics and earned the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association designation for joint replacements. Beyond offering innovative clinical care, the health system offers research and clinical trials for orthopedic patients and earned the Aetna Institutes of Quality for total Joint Replacement distinction.

Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute at Baptist Hospital of Miami. Baptist Health South Florida's Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute cares for the Miami Heat and Miami Dolphins and Florida Panthers. Established at Doctors Hospital, Miami Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute is a 281-bed acute care facility that also sees adult and pediatric trauma patients. U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20.

Morristown (N.J.) Medical Center. Atlantic Health System's Morrison Medical Center is known for innovative orthopedic procedures and equipment. The hospital's surgeons perform more than 4,000 joint replacements each year at the Atlantic Orthopedic Institute, using robotics and gender-specific technology. The system also partners with Atlantic Health System Children's Health and Goryeb Children's Hospital to provide pediatric orthopedic care. The health system is also the official healthcare partner of the New York Jets. In 2019-20, U.S. News & World Report named Morristown Medical Center among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery.

Mount Sinai Hospital (New York City). Mount Sinai Health System's orthopedic services are spread across locations throughout the metropolitan New York City area. U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital among the top 20 hospitals for orthopedics in 2019-20. It also earned The Joint Commission's Advanced Certification in total hip and knee replacement. Mount Sinai is also recognized for its sports medicine expertise, having served as the official medical service provider for the U.S. Open for seven consecutive years. Mount Sinai is home to a center dedicated to serving former NFL players and providing joint replacement to the players.

MUSC Health University Medical Center (Charleston, S.C.). MUSC Health Sports Medicine offers medical coverage or consultation services to several elite athletes and athletic teams including the Charleston Battery, a Class A affiliate of the New York Yankees, and the Women's Tennis Association Volvo Car Open. The hospital is also designated a Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Blue Distinction Center for Spine Surgery and Hip and Knee Replacement. In 2019-20, U.S. News & World Report named MUSC Children's Hospital among the top hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery.

New England Baptist Hospital (Boston). New England Baptist Hospital has spent the past 30 years as the official hospital of the Boston Celtics, providing orthopedic care and other services for the players and their families. It also has a history of innovation, as one of the first hospitals in the country for surgeons to perform total joint replacement. NEBH has earned The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for Advanced Certification for total hip and total knee replacement.

NewYork-Presbyterian (New York City). NewYork-Presbyterian Orthopedics provides a full range of surgical services as well as pioneering spinal procedures at The Spine Hospital. The orthopedics department has more than 150 years of history and has grown to include a surgical volume of 10,900 procedures as of 2016, including 3,475 hip and knee procedures and 3,509 spine procedures. It is also a level 1 adult advanced trauma center and serves as the official hospital and orthopedic physicians for the New York Yankees and New York City FC. The health system's orthopedics department is also busy with research; the National Institutes of Health provided grants to Columbia Orthopedics, a partner of NewYork-Presbyterian, totaling more than $3.3 million.

NorthShore University Hospitals (Evanston, Ill.). The Orthopaedic & Spine Institute at NorthShore University Hospitals includes more than 100 specialty trained physicians who are dedicated to practicing innovative care. The health system includes computer-aided technology for surgical procedures and utilizes regenerative medicine in the NorthShore Orthopaedic & Spine Institute to treat patients. U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital among the top 15 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20.

Northwell Health (New Hyde Park, N.Y.). Northwell Health Orthopaedic Institute focuses on minimally invasive techniques for procedures, including joint replacements and has robotic technology for knee and hip procedures. Several of its hospitals have earned The Joint Commission's disease-specific certification for joint replacements and U.S. News & World Report recognition. In 2017, the health system partnered with Philadelphia-based Rothman Institute to provide additional orthopedic coverage, and 10 Rothman surgeons currently practice at Phelps Hospital Northwell Health.

Northwestern Medicine (Chicago). Northwestern Medicine has a robust orthopedics program that includes joint replacement, spine surgery and sports medicine. U.S. News & World Report ranked two of the system's hospitals Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20. At the system's flagship hospital, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, physicians perform more than 7,000 orthopedic surgeries per year.

NYU Langone Health (New York City). The NYU Langone Orthopedic Hospital provides both inpatient and outpatient surgery for adult and pediatric patients. The hospital's surgeons have provided more than 1,500 outpatient total joint replacements and earned a spot on the U.S. News & World Report top 10 hospitals for orthopedics and rheumatology in 2019-20. NYU Health's Winthrop Hospital was also ranked in the top 50 hospitals for orthopedics by U.S. News for the past year. The health system's department of orthopedic surgery is also focused on research and innovation, offering physicians and scientists to opportunity to collaborate on improving outcomes for the more than 20,000 orthopedic procedures performed by the system's specialists each year.

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center (Columbus). The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is on the forefront of minimally invasive orthopedic procedures and provides comprehensive care for patients. Its specialists are involved in clinical trials examining injury outcomes, ACL tear treatment and bone tumors. The hospital is a level 1 trauma center and includes robotic technology for knee and hip surgery procedures.

OHSU (Portland, Ore.). OHSU orthopedic specialists focus on minimally invasive procedures and rely on innovative research and technology to differentiate from other joint replacement programs in the region. The health system includes three joint replacement surgeons as well as sports medicine, spine and trauma physicians. OHSU's Orthopedics and Rehabilitation department also focuses on research into topics such as stem cells, tissue engineering and spinal fusion enhancements. OHSU is a level 1 trauma center and is ranked as high performing in orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report in 2019-20.

OrthoIndy Hospital (Indianapolis). OrthoIndy Hospital is a physician-owned hospital with three locations focused on orthopedic surgery. The hospital has earned five-star recognition from Healthgrades for joint replacement excellence, spinal fusion surgery and total hip and knee replacement in 2020. Press Ganey Associates also honored the hospital as a Guardian of Excellence Award winner for achieving the 95th percentile of performance from 2009 to 2019. OrthoIndy serves as the official orthopedics providers for the Indiana Pacers as well as Butler University and other local athletic teams.

OrthoNebraska Hospital (Omaha). OrthoNebraska Hospital is a physician-owned hospital with 21 physician owners. The hospital has created raving fans among those it treats; in a survey of Medicare patients, 92 percent said they would recommend OrthoNebraska Hospital, compared with 72 percent at the national average. The hospital takes a customized approach to joint replacements and earned recognition as a Nebraska Center of Excellence for knee and hip replacements by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska. The hospital's physicians and specialists also cover athletic events throughout the state.

Orthopaedic Hospital of Wisconsin (Glendale). Orthopaedic Hospital of Wisconsin is a member of Ascension Wisconsin and serves patients from across the state. Since being established in 2001 as a joint venture between a group of orthopedic surgeons and Columbia St. Mary's Ascension, the hospital has added services and expanded into a larger location. More recently, it ranked in the top 1 percent of hospitals for overall patient satisfaction, as measured by Press Ganey, and earned the Top 100 Workplaces award from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel from 2013 to 2019. The physician-owned hospital participates in Medicare's value-based purchasing program and provides physical therapy and athletic training for UW Milwaukee.

Penn Medicine (Philadelphia). Penn Medicine's orthopedic department is devoted to research, innovation and patient care. The department's surgeons have access to the McKay Orthopaedic Research Laboratory to collaborate on projects; it has more than 100 research personnel and six principle investigators focusing on musculoskeletal tissue engineering, bone metabolism and cancer-associated bone disease and mesenchymal stem cell maintenance. The health system is also home to the current president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Kristy Weber, MD, who serves as the chief of the system's sarcoma program. In 2019-20, U.S. News & World Report ranked Penn Medicine Lancaster (Pa.) General Hospital among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics.

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (Hershey, Pa.). Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center includes the Center for Orthopaedic Research and Translational Science as well as the Bone and Joint Institute and Spine Center. The hospital has 40 orthopedic surgeons focused on a variety of specialties and dedicated to research that advances the field. The faculty's research spans the bone and cartilage cell biology, computational biomechanics and orthopedic implant function and failure. In 2019-20, the hospital earned a spot among U.S. News & World Report's top 50 hospitals for orthopedic surgery.

Porter Adventist Hospital (Denver). Surgeons at The Porter Center for Joint Replacement perform around 2,000 knee and hip replacements each year and recorded a 99 percent patient satisfaction rating from an independent study. The hospital's specialists have published more than 700 journal articles and chapters and earned recognition for hip and knee replacement clinical quality by Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and United Healthcare. The hospital remodeled its six dedicated orthopedic operating suites in 2007 for joint replacements and now hosts international fellowship training in hip, knee and shoulder surgery techniques.

Rothman Orthopaedic Specialty Hospital (Bensalem, Pa.). Rothman Orthopaedic Specialty Hospital is a 65,000-square-foot facility with six operating rooms equipped for joint replacement and other orthopedic procedures. More than 30 physicians and surgeons bring operative and non-operative cases to the hospital. The hospital's team of orthopedic and spine surgeons perform more than 3,000 spine surgeries and nonoperative treatments per year. The hospital earned the Outstanding Patient Excellence Award, Patient Safety Excellence Award and Excellence Awards for total knee, hip and joint replacement from Healthgrades.

Rush University Medical Center (Chicago). Rush University Medical Center orthopedic surgeons perform around 3,800 hip and knee replacements per year. They serve as the team physicians for the Chicago Bulls, White Sox, and Fire soccer team as well as other local athletic organizations. Rush publishes its own annual journal focused on orthopedics and was ranked No. 7 in the nation for orthopedic surgery by U.S. News & World Report in 2019-20. Rush also conducts research, with physicians and scientists participating in clinical trials about conservative treatment for arthritic knee pain and stem cell treatments for rotator cuff conditions.

Saint Francis Hospital Memphis (Tenn.). The Saint Francis Joint and Spine Center includes 23 specialty orthopedic and spine beds within the 479-bed Saint Francis Hospital Memphis. Surgeons performed around 921 spine and joint replacements at the hospital for the first half of 2019, and more than 1,900 in 2018. It was also the first hospital in Memphis to offer robotic total knee replacements, and now its surgeons have completed more than 1,000 partial and total knee replacements with the technology. The Saint Francis Joint and Spine Center is home to a spine surgical robot, which the team has used for more than 500 procedures. The hospital has earned The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval as a certified hip and knee replacement program.

Santa Monica (Calif.)-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital. The UCLA Health and Orthopedic Hospital has built a comprehensive orthopedic program joining surgical and non-surgical specialists, academic medicine and scientific research. The health system's location in Santa Monica has earned the Blue Distinction Center for Knee and Hip Replacement designation from Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and ranked among the top 50 hospitals in the nation by U.S. News & World Report in 2019-20. In terms of research, the health system's orthopedic program is connected to The J. Vernon Luck, Sr., M.D. Orthopaedic Research Center on the UCLA campus, and its faculty ranks among the top 10 in the nation for National Institutes of Health medical-research funding.

Scripps La Jolla (Calif.) Hospitals. The orthopedic surgeons at Scripps perform more than 3,000 hip and knee replacements per year, and the hospital includes robotic technology for increased precision in orthopedic procedures. The system's hospitals have received the Blue Distinction Center designation for orthopedic care from Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and Scripps La Jolla Hospitals was rated in the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report. The health system also has a robust research program through the Scripps Shiley Center for Orthopaedic Research and Education with ongoing projects focused on areas such as allograft transplantations for cartilage repair, joint implant design, joint implant wear testing and orthopedic stem cell research and genomics.

Sentara Leigh Hospital (Norfolk, Va.). The Orthopedic Hospital at Sentara Leigh is an orthopedic specialty hospital offering the full continuum of care. The hospital's joint replacement program includes robotic technology for partial knee replacements, and was home to the 1,000th surgery performed on the Navio robotic system. The 48-bed hospital also includes the Sentara OrthoJoint Center Express Track, which allows patients to leave the hospital one day after joint replacement surgery.

Spectrum Health (Grand Rapids, Mich.). Spectrum Health has a robust orthopedic surgery and joint replacement program, with as many as 95 percent of joint replacement patients reporting high or very high satisfaction ratings after surgery. In 2019, the hospital also earned recognition among America's 100 Best Joint Replacement hospitals from Healthgrades. The health system has around 56 orthopedic surgeons and more than 100 dedicated orthopedic beds. In addition to providing patient care, the orthopedic department also focuses on research and has received around $600,000 in external funding.

St. Luke's Regional Medical Center (Boise, Idaho). In 2018, St. Luke's Health System opened a new 230,000 square-foot orthopedic specialty facility in Boise with 12 operating rooms and 30 beds. The facility can accommodate 20,000 visits and 7,000 surgeries per year. The health system opened a separate orthopedics location after realizing that its community was expanding, with a 10 percent projected increase in demand for orthopedic services from 2017 to 2020. The health system also has a sports medicine and training program with affiliations that span the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association, U.S. Soccer Federation and Ultimate Fighting Championship.

St. Peter's Health Partners (Albany, N.Y.). St. Peter's Hospital Joint Replacement Center surgeons perform 2,500 total hip and knee replacements per year, ranking it among the highest volume hospitals in New York. The hospital also aims to discharge patients to their home, reporting 94 percent of joint replacement patients were discharged home between January 2017 and March 2018, exceeding the national average of 85 percent to 88 percent. The average length of stay for joint replacement patients is also around a half-day shorter at St. Peter's Hospital. In 2018, Women's Choice Award honored the hospital among America's Best Hospitals for Orthopedics and it also earned high performance designation in hip and knee replacement from U.S. News & World Report.

Stanford (Calif.) Health Care-Stanford Hospital. Stanford Hospital's orthopedic team includes around 55 physicians who span joint replacement, spine, sports medicine and extremities care. The hospital includes both inpatient care and an outpatient center in Redwood City, Calif., focused on orthopedics and sports medicine. The hospital's orthopedics department is also focused on research and is currently participating in 17 clinical trials, including studies on pediatric bone tumors and treatment for chronic back pain. U.S. News & World Report ranked Stanford Hospital among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for 2019-20.

Stony Brook (N.Y.) University Hospital. The clinical practice of Stony Brook Medicine includes Stony Brook Orthopaedic Associates, which reports more than 68,000 annual office visits. The hospital's orthopedics team also performs more than 5,600 surgeries each year across both routine and complex specialties. Stony Brook is the only level 1 trauma center in Suffolk County, and has the specialists available to treat orthopedic traumatic injuries. U.S. News & World Report ranked Stony Brook among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics in 2019-20.

Tampa (Fla.) General Hospital. Tampa General Hospital has a skilled, high-volume orthopedic team, reporting low readmission rates, postoperative complications and revision procedures. The hospital reported 600 knee replacement procedures in 2018 and includes robotic technology for more precise, minimally invasive procedures. Tampa General also participates in the CMS Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model. Newsweek honored the hospital in 2019 as one of the World's Best Hospitals for orthopedics based on patient satisfaction, clinician recommendations and key performance indicators. U.S. News & World Report also ranked Tampa General among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics in 2019-20.

Texas Health Presbyterian Plano. As Texas Health Presbyterian Plano aims to grow its orthopedics program, the hospital recently completed a $25.4 million expansion project that added five designated orthopedic operating rooms to its campus. The new rooms include advanced technology for complex joint and spine procedures. The hospital also has a robust sports medicine program, which includes physical therapy, concussion management, athletic training and sports nutrition. U.S. News & World Report distinguished Texas Health Presbyterian Plano as high performing in orthopedics in 2019-20.

Texas Orthopedic Hospital (Houston). Texas Orthopedic Hospital opened in 1995 and is a joint venture between physicians and Fondren Orthopedic Group. It is affiliated with HCA Houston Healthcare and earlier this year earned a spot on the Top Workplaces 2019 list by the Houston Chronicle. The hospital has also ranked consistently in the top 5 percent nationwide by HCAHPS and earned Healthgrades' 5-star recognition for total knee and hip replacements for the past 12 years. In May, Texas Orthopedic affiliated with Texas Southern University and became the official sponsor of its athletic programs.

Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals (Philadelphia). Jefferson Health's department of orthopaedic surgery includes specialists from Rothman Orthopaedics at Jefferson Health, 3B Orthopaedics and Abington Orthopedic & Spine Institute - Jefferson Health. The system's team performs more than 61,000 surgical orthopedic procedures per year and ranked among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report in 2019-20. More than 60 board-certified physicians make up the department, focused on clinical care and research focused on vertebral disc disease and osteoarthritis.

Torrance (Calif.) Memorial Medical Center. The Lundquist Orthopedic Institute at Torrance Memorial Medical Center has earned recognition as a Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Distinction Center for knee and hip replacement surgery as well as spine surgery. It is the fifth largest private orthopedic hospital in Los Angeles County and earned recognition from U.S. News & World Report as one of the top hospitals for orthopedic surgery in 2019-20. Its specialists take a team approach to treating orthopedic patients and support more than 2,100 orthopedic procedures each year.

UC Davis Medical Center (Sacramento). UC Davis Health launched its orthopedics department in 1969, and it has grown into an internationally known orthopedics program. The health system includes the UC Davis Trauma Center, among the three busiest level 1 trauma centers in the country, as well as an adult reconstruction center and sports medicine program. The health system's flagship hospital, UC Davis Medical Center, earned recognition as one of the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report in 2019-20. U.S. News also ranked the health system's Shriner's Hospitals for Children - Northern California among the top hospitals for pediatric orthopedics in the nation this year.

UC San Diego Health-Jacobs Medical Center (La Jolla, Calif.). More than 20 orthopedists make up the team at UC San Diego Health's orthopedic center. The system is the official healthcare provider for the San Diego Padres as well as UC San Diego Athletics. In addition to providing orthopedic care, the health system's specialists participate in clinical trials and have research interest in biologic treatments for injured and diseased tissue, intraoperative tools to assist surgeons during procedures and outcomes for experimental interventions.

UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital (Aurora). The orthopedics team at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital performs more than 4,000 orthopedic surgeries per year. The orthopedics department specializes in joint replacement and preservation, spine and sports medicine, taking an interdisciplinary approach to patient care. U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics in 2019-20. Beyond practicing medicine, the hospital's physicians collaborate with researchers to investigate new techniques and treatments.

UChicago Medicine. The orthopedic surgeons at UChicago Medicine focus on innovating in orthopedic and spine care for more personalized treatments. The health system established the nation's first full-time orthopedic surgery faculty in 1930 and that has grown to include 31 surgical and non-surgical physician specialists. The orthopedics team is also focused on clinical research for musculoskeletal diseases, cartilage regeneration, orthotic techniques and more. U.S. News & World Report distinguished University of Chicago Medical Center as high performing in orthopedics in 2019-20.

UCSF Health (San Francisco). The specialists at the UCSF Arthritis and Joint Replacement Center perform more than 800 hip and knee procedures per year. The health system also has a robust sports medicine program, which includes a sports concussion program and the Sports Medicine Center for Young Athletes, which supports more than 13,000 patient visits and performs around 1,000 surgeries per year for young athletes at all levels, including U.S. Olympians. Finally, the health system treats around 10,000 spine patients per year. U.S. News & World Report ranked UCSF Medical Center among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics in 2019-20.

UMass Memorial Medical Center (Worcester, Mass.). More than 100 experts in orthopedics and rheumatology provide care at UMass Memorial Medical Center. The hospital's joint replacement program earned Blue Distinction Center+ for Knee and Hip surgery from Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and earned the five-star rating from Healthgrades for total knee replacements for three consecutive years, most recently in 2018. The hospital's researches have received $19 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health as well as $1.7 million from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Skin Disease to improve outcomes after total knee replacement surgery.

University Hospital (Augusta, Ga.). To deliver specialized patient care, University Hospital has devoted its ninth floor to a $9 million Orthopaedic & Spine Center with 45 private patient rooms, a dedicated rehabilitation gym and expansive workspace for physicians and nurses. Anchoring University Health Care System, the 812-bed University Hospital is the only facility in its region to receive designation from Blue Cross Blue Shield as a Blue Distinction Center+ for knee and hip replacement and spine surgery. It is also the region's only facility recognized as an Aetna Institute of Quality for joint replacement and spine surgery.

University Hospitals (Cleveland). With nine specialty divisions, University Hospitals' orthopedics department takes pride in its multidisciplinary, collaborative approach to care. Physicians at the 1,032-bed hospital are also enlisted as full-time faculty members at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, a Cleveland institution known for heavy investment in research over the past two decades. Through its sports medicine division, UH serves as the official medical provider for the Cleveland Ballet and the Cleveland Browns.

University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (Iowa City). The orthopedics and rehabilitation department at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics has 48 beds across its system, which includes 10 outpatient clinics and a specialty radiology unit. The department's physicians see around 280 patients per day and around 70,000 patients per year. The orthopedic surgical team performs 7,000 procedures annually. In addition to clinical care, University of Iowa's orthopedic specialists are involved in research for the prevention of osteoarthritis after joint injuries, concussion treatment, sports-related treatment protocol and other innovative projects. U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics in 2019-20.

University of Kansas Hospital (Kansas City, Kan.). The University of Kansas Hospital is home to The University of Kansas Health System's orthopedics department, which includes more than 30 providers. The system is the official healthcare provider for The Kansas City Chiefs and The Kansas City Royals and provides athletic training and sports medicine services at multiple school districts. For 2019-20, University of Kansas Hospital was ranked in the top 10 percent of hospitals for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report.

University of Kentucky Albert B. Chandler Hospital (Lexington). As a university-affiliated program, the orthopedics department at Albert B. Chandler Hospital strives to provide cutting-edge care. The 569-bed hospital opened in 1962 and employs fellowship-trained orthopedic trauma surgeons at its level 1 trauma center, which is the only one in central and eastern Kentucky. UK Chandler Hospital features multiple hospital-based clinics, including one entirely devoted to orthopedic surgery.

University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center (Towson). Each year, more than 25,000 patients come to the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center to see specialists at The Orthopaedic Institute, which is known for excellence in pain management and rapid rehabilitation after joint replacement. The 218-bed hospital partners with Towson Orthopaedic Associates to deliver 1,600 joint replacements a year and offers comprehensive rehabilitation services in conjunction with Towson Sports Medicine. St. Joseph Medical Center's 50-bed orthopedic unit features 32 private patient rooms and a rehabilitation facility.

University of Minnesota Medical Center (Minneapolis). University of Minnesota Medical Center's 50-plus orthopedic providers are nationally and internationally recognized for expertise in sports medicine, physical medicine, family medicine and rheumatology, among other fields. With a physical medicine and rehabilitation program that has been around for more than 50 years and a walk-in clinic for orthopedic and sports medicine services, University of Minnesota Medical Center operates under the belief that muscle, bone and joint pain shouldn't prevent patients from doing the things they enjoy. This approach has helped the hospital obtain Blue Cross Blue Shield's Blue Distinction Centers+ designation for efficiency and expertise in knee and hip surgery.

University of Tennessee Medical Center (Knoxville). With a team of eight orthopedic trauma surgeons, the 685-bed University of Tennessee Medical Center operates East Tennessee's only level 1 trauma center verified by the American College of Surgeons. In October, the hospital unveiled plans to open a freestanding orthopedic surgery center in partnership with Knoxville-based OrthoTennessee and University Orthopedic Surgeons. University of Tennessee Medical Center was the first in the state to receive The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for Advanced Certification for total hip and total knee replacement.

University of Virginia Medical Center (Charlottesville). With more than 84,000 patients visiting its clinics, UVA Orthopedics recorded 1,189 hip and knee surgeries from mid-2018 to mid-2019, while beating the national average length of stay for hip fracture patients. University of Virginia Medical Center also beat the national average on surgical infection rates for hip replacement for 2018. University of Virginia Medical Center was also the state's first hospital to receive premier certification from the International Geriatric Fracture Society and earned recognition from Blue Cross Blue Shield as a Blue Distinction Center for knee and hip replacement.

University Hospital-Michigan Medicine (Ann Arbor). Under the leadership of former chair James E. Carpenter, MD, who stepped down in May, Michigan Medicine's orthopedic surgery department has grown to include several dozen faculty members and nearly 400 staff members. In addition, the system accommodates over 300,000 outpatient visits annually at its Comprehensive Musculoskeletal Center. The center now employs 250-plus physicians across 22 facilities, including the 550-bed University Hospital which earned recognition among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedic surgery by U.S. News & World Report for 2019-20.

University of Utah Hospital (Salt Lake City). University of Utah Hospital's Center for Hip & Knee Reconstruction leverages resources from the University Orthopaedic Center and University of Utah Health to diagnose and treat patients. The system's orthopedic surgery department received $12.4 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2018, earning a No. 1 ranking from The Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research. Designated as a Blue Distinction Center for knee and hip replacement, University of Utah Hospital is home to the Center for Hip & Knee Reconstruction, a charter member of the American Joint Replacement Registry.

UPMC (Pittsburgh). Encompassing 13 research laboratories with funding from the National Institutes of Health and other institutions, UPMC's orthopedic surgery department helps shape the field's future through evidence-based studies and clinical trials. The organization's sports medicine division is the official medical provider of the Pittsburgh Steelers and over 60 high school, college and regional teams and events, providing specialized treatment for athletes at two full-service sports complexes. With high marks in advanced technologies, patient services, nurse staffing and patient volumes, UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside was ranked among the top 50 hospitals in the nation for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report for 2019-20.

UR Medicine (Rochester, N.Y.). UR Medicine supports robust orthopedic services across its seven hospitals. The Evarts Joint Center at Highland Hospital earned the Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for knee and hip replacements, and the Aetna Institutes of Quality also distinguished the center for excellence in orthopedics. UR Medicine's orthopedic surgeons are also involved in research and are among the top in the nation for National Institutes of Health orthopedics research funding. The system's Center for Musculoskeletal Research includes 75 scientists that work alongside principal investigators and researchers to improve bone health.

UT Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas). With a team of 28 orthopedic specialists, UT Southwestern Medical Center offers a multidisciplinary approach to care across six locations. Surgeons at the academic medical center pioneered minimally invasive percutaneous surgery and were the first in North Texas to use a female-specific prosthetic for knee replacement. Led by professor and chair Dane Wukich, MD, the hospital's orthopedic surgery department has researchers currently involved in more than four dozen clinical studies.

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100 hospitals and health systems with great orthopedic programs | 2019 - Becker's Hospital Review

Investigating the Human Intestinal Mucus Barrier Up-close and Personal – Technology Networks

We have a mutualistic but complicated relationship with the collection of microbes in our gut, known as the intestinal microbiome. This complex community of bacteria breaks down different food components, and releases nutrients such as vitamins and a plethora of other factors that control functions in tissues way beyond the intestinal tract. However, the sheer numbers of microbes also present a threat as they can trigger inflammation, which is thought to be at the root of many intestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, radiation-induced intestinal injury, and some cancers.

To allow the uptake of beneficial substances from the gut lumen, and at the same time prevent gut microbes from contacting the intestinal epithelial tissue surface, specialized cells called goblet cells continuously produce mucus, the slimy goo-like substance that coats the entire intestinal surface. Mucus thus far has been notoriously difficult to study: its structure quickly disintegrates in surgically removed sections of the gut, the system most often used to study mucus, and no in vitro culture system has been able to reconstitute an in vivo-like mucus layer with the natural structure seen in living intestine outside the human body. Adding to these difficulties, mucus also differs between humans and other species, different sections of the intestinal tract, and even different individuals.

Now, focusing on the large intestine or colon which houses the greatest number of commensal microbes and has the thickest mucus layer, a team of tissue engineers at Harvards Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has developed a colon-on-a-chip (Colon Chip) microfluidic culture device lined by patient-derived colon cells that spontaneously accumulates a mucus layer with the thickness, bi-layered structure, and barrier functions typically found in normal human colon. The mucosal surface in their model also responds to the inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by mounting a rapid swelling response. Their findings are published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Our approach provides researchers with the opportunity to find answers to questions about normal and disease-associated mucus biology, such as its contributions to intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancers, and complex host-microbiome interactions, said Founding Director Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is the senior investigator on the study. Importantly, we use patient-derived cells to line these devices and so this represents an entirely new approach for personalized medicine where it can be possible to study how mucus functions or dysfunctions in a particular patient, and to tailor therapy accordingly.

Ingber is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Childrens Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at Harvards John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. His team is part of a multi-institutional collaboration supported by a Cancer Research UK Grand Challenge grant in which his Wyss team investigates how inflammation-related changes contribute to formation of cancers, including colon cancers. The Grand Challenge is an ambitious international cancer research initiative, supporting world-leading teams of scientists to take on some of the toughest challenges in cancer, and giving them the freedom to try novel approaches at scale.

The teams approach starts out with patient-derived colon cells from colon resections and endoscopic biopsies that are first grown as organoids, tiny organized balls of colon tissue that contain mainly epithelial stem cells. After fragmenting the organoids, their cells are used to populate the upper of a two parallel channels of a microfluidic chip that are separated by a porous membrane. Simply by perfusing the channels continuously with nutrient medium, the colon stem cells grow into a continuous sheet and form highly functional goblet cells that secrete mucus.

Growing the cells on-chip under flow results in about 15% of epithelial cells spontaneously differentiating into goblet cells. Distributed throughout the epithelium, these produce an in vivo-like mucus layer, said first-author Alexandra Sontheimer-Phelps, a graduate student from the University of Freiburg, Germany, working in Ingbers group. At the same time, other epithelial cells that keep dividing also replenish the goblet cell population just like in living colon, which means that the chip can be maintained in steady-state conditions for more than two weeks, which makes it highly useful for longer-term studies.

The Wyss team showed that the colon epithelium in the chip is fully polarized with distinct markers restricted to its lumen-exposed, mucus-secreting side and its opposite membrane-binding side. Its goblet cells secrete the major mucus protein mucin 2 (MUC2), which when linked to complex chains of sugar molecules, assembles into multi-molecular network or gel that takes up water. Our approach actually produces the bi-layered structure of normal colon mucus with an inner dense layer that we show is impenetrable to bacteria-mimicking particles flowed through the intestinal channel, and a more loose outer layer that allows particles to enter. This has never been accomplished before in vitro, said Sontheimer-Phelps.

To investigate the functionality of the mucus, she and her co-workers exposed the chip to the inflammatory mediator PGE2. The mucus underwent rapid swelling within minutes and independent of any new mucus secretion, and this process of mucus accumulation can be visualized in living cultures by viewing the chips from the side with dark field illumination. This dynamic response could be blocked by inhibiting one particular ion channel, which pumps ions into the colon epithelium and passively allow water molecules to follow and apparently, this drives mucus swelling when stimulated by signals such as PGE2.

Mucus has long been thought to be a passive, host barrier, but it is becoming increasingly clear that microbial species affect its structure and function in addition to feeding on its carbohydrates as an energy source. Our in vitro system brings us one step closer to figuring out how individual bacterial species and more complex microbial communities can affect mucus and vice versa, as well as how this complex interplay impacts development of intestinal diseases. We also now have a testbed to discover new therapeutic drug and probiotic strategies that might prevent or reverse these diseases said Ingber.

Reference:Sontheimer-Phelps, A., Chou, D. B., Tovaglieri, A., Ferrante, T. C., Duckworth, T., Fadel, C., Ingber, D. E. (2019). Human colon-on-a-chip enables continuous in vitro analysis of colon mucus layer accumulation and physiology. Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcmgh.2019.11.008

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

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Investigating the Human Intestinal Mucus Barrier Up-close and Personal - Technology Networks

Stem cells do help restore heart function but in a different way – News-Medical.net

A new study published in the journal Nature shows that stem cells do work well to repair the damaged heart but in an entirely different manner than was originally supposed. The study shows that stem cells, whether living or dead, when injected into the area of damage in the heart in mice, activate an intense acute inflammation. This triggers the classic wound healing response which finally results in the partial or complete recovery of mechanical function of the injured area.

Stem cells are a hot new area of intensive research in almost every field of medical science. These cells are characterized by their property of self-renewal and ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They have long been thought to stimulate tissue repair and regeneration by differentiating into the native tissue cells that were injured in the given organ or tissue.

In this microscopic histology image, macrophage immune cells (shown in red and green) flock to the injured region of a damaged mouse heart three days after researchers injected adult heart stem cells within the yellow dotted area. Researchers report Nov. 27 in Nature that stem cell therapy helps hearts recover from heart attack by triggering an innate immune response that alters cell activity around the injured area so that it heals with a more optimized scar and improved contractile properties.

Stem cells cause inflammation which is due to macrophage activation. Macrophages are the early warning system of the immune response. They tell the body when stem cells are seen where they are normally absent, in this case. The resulting inflammation causes secondary wound healing that ends in a slight improvement in heart function after a heart attack. The CCR2+ and CX3CR1+ macrophages cause acute inflammation.

The macrophages, along with other nonspecific immune cells, are part of the innate immune response which is the first to react to an antigen or invader. Once this response sets in, the cells around the injured area begin to show a new pattern and level of activity. This eventually causes the scar that is forming to become healthier, resulting in better contractility of the heart tissue in the damaged part.

Earlier research in 2014 by the same team, published in the same journal, provided the basis for the current study. In the prior study, the scientists injected c-kit positive stem cells into the damaged heart. They expected that these cells would replace cardiomyocytes but it did not happen. This made the researchers ask how actually stem cell therapy worked. To answer this question, they designed a new way of looking at stem cells used as treatment.

They used 2 commonly used types of heart stem cells, namely, mononuclear cells from the bone marrow and cardiac progenitor cells. They looked at the data they had on these cells, testing it and revalidating it, under several different conditions. They were surprised to see that the heart grew stronger if either of the two stem cells were injected, but also if dead stem cells or an inert chemical called zymosan was injected. Zymosan is chemically inert but can provoke innate immunity.

The researchers found that whatever injection was used, the acute sterile immune response that set in caused a difference in the formation of the connective tissue that makes up the extracellular matrix, an important component of the extracellular environment. As a result, the border zone extracellular matrix is reduced. In addition, this inflammation also improved the scars mechanical strength. Cardiac fibroblasts became more active. This was observed because injected hearts produced a significantly greater change in passive force over increasing stretch, a profile that was more like uninjured hearts.

To achieve this healing the chemical or stem cells must be injected straight into the heart, right around the damaged area. In most cases of previous stem cell research for ischemic heart damage, the injections have been into the circulation, citing patient safety. This could be the reason why so many trials have shown inconsistent results they were badly designed. Researcher Jeffery Molkentin sums it up: Our results show that the injected material has to go directly into the heart tissue flanking the infarct region. This is where the healing is occurring and where the macrophages can work their magic.

And in the case of zymosan, they were interested to note that the beneficial effect produced by injecting this chemical into the damaged area was a little greater and lasted a little longer than when stem cells (dead or alive) were used.

The researchers say, The implications of our study are very straight forward and present important new evidence about an unsettled debate in the field of cardiovascular medicine. They plan to find new and better ways to harness this healing potential of these stem cells and molecules, or even the macrophages themselves. For instance, looking at the intense inflammation triggered by the injection of any of the three agents, the team would like to test the possibility of polarizing macrophages, or forming a biological queue of macrophages that will be able only to heal thus exploiting the healing resources of this immune cell type.

If they succeed, it could change the way heart disease is treated in the future.

Journal reference:

Vagnozzi, R.J., Maillet, M., Sargent, M.A. et al. An acute immune response underlies the benefit of cardiac stem-cell therapy. Nature (2019) doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1802-2, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1802-2

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Stem cells do help restore heart function but in a different way - News-Medical.net

Medicine of the future: cell technologies in Ukraine – Interfax-Ukraine

How to score a decisive penalty to the disease? A football-player Andrii Shevchenko tells own experience of stem cell treatment

December 3rd, the Institute of Cell Therapy will present in Kiev the first results of the placental stem cells clinical trials in Ukraine in a partnership with the Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics of NAMS of Ukraine and Kiev Clinical Hospital 6. This time the specialists will focus attention on such prevalent diseases as knee joints arthrosis and joints injuries, in particular in professional athletes. Andrii Shevchenko, a legendary football-player and trainer of the national team of Ukraine will participate in the press-conference.

Cell therapy is an innovative, extremely promising method of diseases and injuries treatment, that allows to restore damaged tissues of the body with the help of the new cells, the stem cells. Stem cells have a unique capability to transform into all types of tissues and cells of the body, in particular the cells of blood, liver, myocardium, cartilaginous or nervous tissue. Courtesy of this they restore damaged organs and their functions.

Knee arthrosis is called the disease of the piano players and athletes. The most frequently this disease affects people, whose body is exposed to the extreme loadings, in particular athletes. The females and males, aged over 50, are also in the risk group, from which almost one third is diagnosed the arthrosis of knee joints. This disease is accompanied by the severe pain, limitations at walking and sometimes even by the total inability to move.

The result of the clinical trials, conducted by the Institute of Cell Therapy in the partnership with the Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics of NAMS of Ukraine and Kiev Clinical Hospital 6 should become the opportunity to use cell therapy for knee arthrosis treatment, improve of the life quality of the patients, suffering from this pathology as well as to avoid or postpone the surgery on knee joint replacement for the artificial one. Stem cells are used worldwide for the treatment of approximately 100 severe diseases, in some disorders this is the only effective method of therapy.

Institute of Cell Therapy is a hightechnological medical institution, specializing on research, medical services and has the own Centre of Science with a Laboratory for Placenta Stem Cells. The Institute already has the experience of clinical trials performance on cell and tissue drugs, after completion of which the Ministry of Health of Ukraine issued a permission for the use of the tested technology of manufacturing and application of cell/tissue preparations, in particular for the treatment of pancreonecrosis and disorders of lower limbs peripheral arteries with the umbilical cord blood stem cells and autologous adipose tissue.

Today 4 clinical trials on the use of cell and tissue therapy methods are on the final stage and other 4 trials are going on.

The press-conference, devoted to the innovative approach in the therapy of knee joint using placenta stem cells will take place on December 3rd at 11 am at the address: Medical campus, Liubomyr Husar (Kosmonaut Komarov avenue, 3, Institute of Cell Therapy.

Participants of the press-conference are:

1. Mykola Sokolov, MD, PhD, Chief Doctor of the Institute of Cell Therapy, leading specialist in cell technologies.

2. Volodymyr Shablii, PhD, Deputy CEO of the Stem Cells Bank, Chief of the Laboratory for Placenta Stem Cells of the Institute of Cell Therapy. Member of the International Placenta Stem Cell Society.

3. Ievgen Golyuk, MD, PhD, Chief of the Scientific and Practical Centre of Tissue and Cell Therapy of the state institution Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine.

4. Roman Birsa, MD, a physician of the highest qualification category, orthopedist-traumatologist of the Department of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Kiev City Clinical Hospital 6.5. Petro Nemtinov, MD, PhD, a senior researcher of the Coordination Centre of Transplantation of Organs, Tissues and Cells of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine.

Special guest: Andrii Shevchenko, a legendary football player, the chief trainer of the national football team of Ukraine.

Accreditation of journalists is mandatory: office@med-info.com.ua; tel. 098 20 47 59

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Medicine of the future: cell technologies in Ukraine - Interfax-Ukraine

Stem Cell Therapy May Improve Heart Health In New Ways – TheHealthMania

Recently, a new study that appears in the journal Nature, focuses on stem cell therapy and shows unexpected ways in which it may be helpful in recovering the health of the heart. Stem cell therapy has become popular in the past few years due to its benefits for a big number of health conditions.

Currently, there is major ongoing research on stem cells since they are responsible for the regeneration of new cells and may play a fundamental role in understanding the development of a variety of different diseases as well as their potential treatments.

Some of the recent discoveries of medical science include using stem cells as regenerative medicine as they can be turned into particular types of cells that may be able to replace tissues damaged as a result of health issues and thereby control the disease.

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The therapy can be specifically useful for people with conditions such as type 1 diabetes, spinal cord injuries, Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, stroke, cancer, burns, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, heart disease, and osteoarthritis.

At the moment, the most successful procedure that involves stem cell therapy is performing a bone marrow transplant. This surgical operation replaces the cells which have been damaged during chemotherapy by programmed stem cells. People are usually able to maintain and live a normal life after recovery from the surgery.

Furthermore, stem cell usage in clinical trials designed for testing the effectiveness, safety, and potential negative impact of new drugs. To do so, the stem cells can be programmed into becoming the type of cells that the drug aims to target.

The new study, which was led by Jeffery Molkentin who is a professor of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the director of Molecular Cardiovascular Microbiology a Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center, takes data from a study from the same journal, Nature, from the years 2014 which was conducted by the same medical team.

In the new paper, the team with Molkentin as the principal investigator found some unexpected results. There were two types of stem cells in the clinical trial cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells.

The main objective of the new trial was to re-evaluate the results of the 2014 study, which showed that injecting c-kit positive heart stem in the heart does not help in the regeneration of cardiomyocytes, to see how the cell therapy can be made to be effective.

It was instead discovered that injecting an inert chemical called zymosan, which is designed particularly for inducing an innate immune response, or dead stem cells can also be beneficial for the recovery of heart as they may speed up the healing procedure.

Injecting either dead stem cells or zymosan led to a reduction in the development of cellular matrix connective tissue in the areas which had been damaged in the heart. In addition, the mechanical properties of the targeted scar also improved.

Another important finding was that chemical substances such as zymosan are required to be injected directly into the heart for optimum results. In previous clinical trials, direct injections were avoided for safety reasons.

Molkentin and the team state that follow-up studies and trials on this new discovery are imminent as they may be important for developing therapies in the future.

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Stem Cell Therapy May Improve Heart Health In New Ways - TheHealthMania

Stem Cells Doctors | Regenerative Medicine | Stem Cell …

Regenerative medicine, the most recent and emerging branch of medical science, deals with functional restoration of tissues or organs for the patient suffering from severe injuries or chronic diseaseconditions, in the state where bodies own regenerative responses do not suffice

The spectacular progress in the field of stem cell research has laid the foundation for cell based therapies of disease which cannot be cured by conventional medicines. The indefinite self-renewal and potential to differentiate into other types of cells represent stem cells as frontiers of regenerative medicine.

The Center for Regenerative Medicine takes three interrelated approaches:

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Stem Cells Doctors | Regenerative Medicine | Stem Cell ...

Intermountain to open new center for pediatric precision medicine – Healthcare IT News

Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital, along with University of Utah Health, and Intermountain Precision Genomics are teaming up to launch a pediatric center for personalized medicine that will serve the Intermountain West.

WHY IT MATTERS The center will use precision genomics to discover, address and treat genetic diseases, many of which affect infants and children and can cause life-long disability.

The Center will focus on precision diagnosis, gene therapies and novel therapeutics, and stem cell, immunologic and regenerative medicine.

Precision medicine includes applications across diagnostics, prevention and screening that takes into account individual variabilities in genes, environment, and lifestyle for every individual.

Through its work on precision diagnosis, the Center hopes to provide more targeted care to critically-ill children based on their genetic make-up, where rapid whole genome sequencing can quickly identify genetic causes of hard-to-diagnose diseases.

The initial efforts will be focused on providing answers to critically ill infants in the newborn intensive care unit, and children with severe seizures and heart conditions.

The research into gene therapies and novel therapeutics will help enable children with previously debilitating and fatal genetic diseases, with clinical trials testing gene therapy treatments for Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy, Adrenoleukodystrophy, and other serious diseases.

The Center is also developing novel therapeutics that target specific diseases and improve health, with a release noting the Center is one of only six hospitals nationwide to provide gene therapy for the common childhood genetic condition spinal muscular atrophy.

Stem cell research uses a child's own cells, or genetically modifies a child's cells and immune system, to fight disease and promote healing, with additional research aimed at developing immunotherapy as a tool to fight pediatric brain tumors.

The organization also noted clinical trials are testing the use of stem cells in repairing diseased hearts and other tissues.

THE LARGER TRENDIntermountain has been busy on this front recently. In June, the health system announced that it is performing a massive clinical DNA study, pairing 500,000 samples drawn from Intermountain Healths patient population and analyzing them with help from deCODE, a subsidiary of Reykjavik-based Amgen.

"Better health and being able to cure common diseases is the promise of precision medicine, but its not happening fast enough," said Dr. Marc Harrison, president and CEO at Intermountain Healthcare, announcing that initiative. "For too long, the genetic code to better health has been locked. This collaboration with deCODE unlocks that insight so we can rapidly advance well-being not only for ourselves and our families, but for generations to come.

Intermountain's new pediatrics personalized medicine announcement also follows Mount Sinai's just-announced plans to build new precision medicine supercomputer, which will have 15 terabytes of memory, 14 petabytes of raw storage and a peak speed of 220 teraflops per second, to manage massive amounts of genomic data.

ON THE RECORD"Our mission is to leverage the expertise of our scientists, the clinical care of our physicians and care-givers, and the dedication of our community, to discover and develop new cures for children," said Dr. Josh Bonkowsky, Intermountain's medical director of the Primary Children's Center for Personalized Medicine, in a statement. "The work we are doing here and now is transforming pediatric medicine. We will not be done until we have put these diseases out of business."

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.Email the writer:nathaneddy@gmail.comTwitter:@dropdeaded209

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

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Intermountain to open new center for pediatric precision medicine - Healthcare IT News

Regenerative Medicine Market size with global investment, top companies analysis, new business developments and forecast 2025 – WindStreetz

Industry Analysis of Regenerative Medicine MarketGlobal Regenerative Medicine Industry was valued at USD 28 Billion in the year 2016. Global Regenerative Medicine Industry is further estimated to grow at a CAGR of 23.2% from 2018 to reach USD 123 Billion by the year 2025.

Reconstructive surgeries for bones and joints is the backbone of the regenerative medicine market. Geologically, because of the predominance of the bone and joint reconstruction industry, the US has the greatest space. This is trailed by Europe. Notwithstanding, because of late positive enactment in Japan and Europe, the stem cell arena will develop all the more significantly in these locales throughout the following five years. By 2025, it is conceivable that Europe will outperform the US advertise as for undifferentiated cell applications, and this will turn out to be almost certain if the Trump Administration limits legislation and funding.

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In addition, high investments by government and private organizations that support R&D, further encourage industry progress. Initiatives bygovernment organizations to support stem cell & regenerative medicine R&D by providing funds and infrastructure facilities along with initiating various programs is expected to influence growth.

Global Regenerative Medicine Market Study consists of the historical data to 2018 and forecasts until 2025. The report is created keeping in mind to make it a valuable source of information for market specialists in readily accessible documents. The documents are curated with clearly presented graphs and figures. Further, the scope of the report has covered a broad report on investigation of the general business, improvement openings, and regional and sub-local possibilities.

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Based on Profile & Business Performance Outstanding Competitors in the market are Astellas Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Ocata Therapeutics), AstraZeneca, Athersys, Baxter International (Baxalta, Shire), Bayer, Caladrius Biosciences (NeoStem), Celgene, CHA Biotech, Chimerix, Cynata Therapeutics, Cytori Therapeutics, Eisai, Genzyme (Sanofi), GSK, Janssen, InCyte Corp, MedImmune, MEDIPOST, Merck, Mesoblast, Millennium Pharmaceutical, NuVasive, Osiris Therapeutics, Plasticell, Pluristem Therapeutics, Pfizer, SanBio Current Stem Cell Trials, Seattle Genetics Current Stem Cell Trials, StemCells Inc, STEMCELL Technologies, Takara Bio, Teva Current Stem Cell Trials, Tigenix.

The research report highlights the size, share, trends and growth analysis of the Regenerative Medicine market on a global level.

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Regenerative Medicine Market size with global investment, top companies analysis, new business developments and forecast 2025 - WindStreetz